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Graduate Calendar Archives: 2003 / 2004

Sociology and Anthropology


Loeb Building B742
Telephone: (613) 520-2582
Fax: (613) 520-4062
Web site: www.carleton.ca/socanth/

The Department

Chair of the Department: C. Gordon

Coordinator of Graduate Programs in Sociology: D. Forcese

Coordinator of the Graduate Program in Anthropology: J. Chevalier

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology offers programs of advanced study and research leading to the M.A. and the Ph.D. degrees in Sociology, and the M.A. in Anthropology.

The principal focus of the graduate programs in sociology is the organization and development of contemporary societies in comparative context and with particular reference to Canadian society. Specializations in theory and methodology, social stratification and power, cultural and gender studies, and in comparative institutions are offered.

The anthropology program focuses on the social and cultural other, including its popular and scholarly representations, through current emphasis on three program concentrations:

  • the anthropology of signs and symbols
  • North American native studies
  • the anthropology of development and underdevelopment.

The department strives to achieve a blend of research and formal graduate instruction in its graduate programs.

Qualifying-Year Program

Applicants with general (3-year) bachelor's degrees may be admitted into a qualifying-year program designed to raise their standing to honours status. Students earning at least high honours standing in their qualifying-year courses will be considered for admission into the master's program.

Refer to the General Regulations section of this Calendar for details of the regulations governing the qualifying year.

Master of Arts in Sociology

Admission Requirements

The requirement for admission into the master's program is a B.A.(Honours) (or the equivalent) with at least high honours standing. Where relevant, previous professional experience will be taken into account in determining an applicant's standing on admission.

The deadlines for submitting applications and supporting documents for graduate study in sociology are as follows: February 1 for students requesting financial assistance; July 1 for students not requesting financial assistance but who are seeking admission in September; and November 1 for students who are seeking admission in January.

Program Requirements

Master's students in sociology are required to select and follow one of the optional program patterns below, chosen in consultation with a graduate adviser:

Thesis Program

  • 3.0 credits. Under certain circumstances one of the courses may be selected from those offered at the senior undergraduate level. SOCI 5005 and SOCI 5809 are highly recommended, especially for students who at the time of registration have not decided on a thesis topic
  • A thesis equivalent to 2.0 credits
  • An oral examination on the candidate's thesis and program

Research Essay Program

  • 4.0 credits. Under certain circumstances one of the courses may be selected from those offered at the senior undergraduate level. SOCI 5809, is highly recommended, especially for students who at the time of initial registration have not decided on a research topic
  • A research essay equivalent to 1.0 credit
  • An oral examination on the candidate's research essay and program

Course Work Program

  • 5.0 credits excluding SOCI 5905. Under certain circumstances one of the courses may be selected from those offered at the senior undergraduate level
  • Written and oral comprehensive examination in the candidate's area of specialization and program

Concentration in Quantitative Methodology

Students in either the research essay or thesis program options may pursue a concentration in quantitative methodology. For a concentration in quantitative methodology courses selected must include the following:

  • SOCI 5005
  • SOCI 5809
  • At least 1.0 credit selected from: SOCI 5101; SOCI 5102; SOCI 5103; SOCI 5104; SOCI 5105; SOCI 5201; SOCI 5605
  • At least 1.0 credit in sociology at the graduate level (not including those listed above)

Students in the Concentration in Quantitative Methodology may apply for admission into a Cooperative Education option. This option provides an opportunity for students to enhance their educational experience through a work placement directly related to their area of interest and expertise. Once admitted into this option, students shall enrol in SOCI 5907. The conditions of the placement are arranged with the student's supervisor and the graduate coordinator. Grades for the cooperative education placement are assigned in consultation between the placement supervisor and the graduate coordinator. Placements can be held for up to two academic terms and count for 1.0 credit.

Transfer from Thesis to Course Work M.A.

Students who choose to change from the thesis to the course work program must normally do so before registering for a third term after initial, full-time registration, or before registering for a fifth term after initial part-time registration.

Academic Standing

A grade of B- or better must normally be obtained in each credit counted toward the master's degree. With the recommendation of the department, and permission of the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research, a candidate may be allowed a grade of C+ in 1.0 credit.

Master of Arts in Anthropology

Admission Requirements

The requirement for admission into the master's program is a B.A.(Honours) (or the equivalent) with at least high honours standing. Where relevant, previous professional experience will be taken into account in determining an applicant's standing on admission.

The deadlines for submitting applications and supporting documents for graduate study in anthropology are as follows: February 1 for students requesting financial assistance; July 1 for students not requesting financial assistance but who are seeking admission in September; and November 1 for students who are seeking admission in January.

Program Requirements

Master's students in anthropology are required to select and follow one of the optional program patterns below, chosen in consultation with a graduate adviser:

Thesis Program

  • 3.0 credits to include:
    • ANTH 5401 (normally to be taken in the first fall term after admission to the program);
    • ANTH 5402;
    • 2.0 additional credits selected from the anthropology graduate course offerings; from courses offered in the sociology graduate program (especially in theory and methods, or in areas which relate to the student's thesis research interests); from 4000-level courses offered in the sociology and anthropology undergraduate program (with permission of the graduate committee); or any combination of these selected in consultation with the student's graduate adviser. Courses in other programs in the University may also be selected, especially if they relate to the student's proposed thesis research, but normally not in excess of 1.0 credit;
  • A thesis equivalent to 2.0 credits;
  • An oral examination on the candidate's thesis and program.

Course Work Program

  • 5.0 credits excluding ANTH 5905, consisting of:
    • ANTH 5401 (normally to be taken in the first fall term after admission to the program);
    • ANTH 5402;
    • 4.0 additional credits as described in the thesis program above, chosen in consultation with the student's graduate adviser;
  • A written and oral comprehensive examination in the candidate's area of specialization and program.

Transfer from Thesis to Course Work M.A.

Students who choose to change from the thesis to the course work program must normally do so before registering for a third term after initial, full-time registration, or before registering for a fifth term after initial part-time registration.

Academic Standing

A grade of B- or better must normally be obtained in each credit counted toward the master's degree. With the recommendation of the department, and permission of the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research, a candidate may be allowed a grade of C+ in 1.0 credit or each of two 0.5 credits.

Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology

The substantive focus of the Ph.D. program is the organization and development of contemporary societies, both in a comparative context and with particular reference to Canadian society.

The Ph.D. program in sociology normally will be undertaken on a full-time basis; however in exceptional cases the department will consider admission on a part-time basis.

Admission Requirements

The minimum requirement for admission into the Ph.D. program is a master's degree (or the equivalent) in sociology, normally with a minimum average of B+ in courses (including the thesis where applicable), and with no grade below B.

Applicants who have deficiencies in certain areas may be admitted to the Ph.D. program, but will normally be required to complete additional course work.

The deadlines for submitting applications and supporting documents for admission into the Ph.D. program in sociology are as follows: February 1 for students requesting financial assistance; July 1 for students not requesting financial assistance but who are seeking admission in September; and November 1 for students who are seeking admission in January.

Program Requirements

The specific program requirements of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology are the following:

  • 10.0 credits including SOCI 6000, and a thesis equivalent to a maximum of 7.0 credits or a minimum of 5.0 credits;
  • Written and oral comprehensive examinations in two areas of specialization;
  • Presentation of a thesis proposal;
  • Language requirements as stated below ;
  • An oral defence of the thesis.

Comprehensive Examinations

Each Ph.D. candidate is required to write comprehensive examinations in two of the following areas:

  • Theory and Methodology
  • Stratification and Power
  • Cultural Studies
  • Applied Social Research

Subjects of instruction and research subsumed under these four areas are:

Theory and Methodology

  • Logic of Social Scientific Inquiry
  • Classical Social Theories
  • Contemporary Social Theories
  • Feminist Theories
  • Research Methods (Historical, Qualitative, and Quantitative)

Stratification and Power

  • Occupations, Organizations, and the Labour Process
  • Class Analysis and Social Stratification
  • Political Sociology
  • Race and Ethnic Relations
  • Gender Relations
  • Political Economy
  • Canadian Society
  • Social and Economic Development
  • Citizenship Studies
  • Governance, Regulation, and Law

Cultural Studies

  • Communication and Popular Cultures
  • Ethnographic Analysis
  • Discourse Analysis
  • Social Anthropology
  • Social and Virtual Spaces

Applied Social Research

  • Criminal Justice
  • Health and Illness Policy
  • Population Studies
  • Sociology of Language
  • Built Environments
  • Education Policy

Upon petition to the sociology graduate program's coordinator, an approved field in sociology or a related discipline may be substituted for one of the options above. The subjects of instruction and research subsumed under each of the areas are indicative, and may be subsumed under more than one area, depending on the analytic approach adopted.

The comprehensive examinations are to be completed after course requirements for the Ph.D. have been completed. Normally comprehensive examinations must be completed no later than two years or six terms after initial full-time registration, and four years or twelve terms after initial part-time registration.

The thesis proposal is to be presented after comprehensive requirements have been completed. Normally the thesis proposal must be presented no later than two and one-half years or seven terms after initial full-time registration and five years or fifteen terms after initial part-time registration.

Language Requirement

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology requires each Ph.D. candidate to demonstrate an understanding of a language other than English. Although French is the preferred second language, students may be permitted to substitute another language if it is demonstrably relevant to their professional interests. It is strongly advised, however, that all English-speaking candidates be proficient in French. The language requirements may be satisfied by a demonstration of reasonable understanding, on sight, of material contained in selected samples of sociological literature in that language. Students may find it necessary or advisable to take a course in the required language before undertaking the departmental language examination.

Academic Standing

Candidates must obtain a grade of B- or better in each credit, and Satisfactory on the comprehensive examinations, the Ph.D. thesis and its oral defence.

Graduate Courses

Not all of the following courses are offered in a given year. For an up-to-date statement of course offerings for 2003-2004 and to determine the term of offering, consult the Registration Instructions and Class Schedule booklet, published in the summer and also available online at www.carleton.ca/cu/programs/sched_dates/

Course Designation System

Carleton's course designation system has been restructured. The first entry of each course description below is the new alphanumeric Carleton course code, followed by its credit value in brackets. The old Carleton course number (in parentheses) is included for reference, where applicable.

SOCI 5000 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.500)
Classical Sociological Theory
Crucial sociological concepts and ideas by the founders of sociology. Attention will be given to Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Pareto, Comte, and Husserl.
SOCI 5001 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.501)
Selected Topics in Classical Theory
Topic varies from year to year.
Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
SOCI 5002 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.502)
Contemporary Sociological Theory
Major theoretical perspectives in sociology, including social behaviourism; social action theories such as symbolic interactionism, phenomenological sociology, ethnomethodology; and structuralist theories such as structural functionalism, neo-Marxism and critical theory.
SOCI 5003 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.503)
Selected Topics in Contemporary Theory
Topic varies from year to year. Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
ANTH 5004 [0.5 credit] (formerly 54.504)
Ecological Anthropology
Anthropological approaches to the study of human environment relationships and to current problems of ecological degradation affecting native societies around the world.
SOCI 5005 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.505)
Recurring Debates in Social Thought
Recurring issues and debates in the discipline. Topics such as the nature of social science; the objective world versus social construction; questions of evidence, meaning and measurement; agency versus structure; the relation between research and praxis; knowledge and power, may be considered.
Prerequisite: The course is restricted to M.A. students in sociology. Others may be admitted by permission of the Department.
SOCI 5007 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.507)
Social Change and Economic Development
Critical examination of studies of change and development in historical and contemporary national and transnational systems.
SOCI 5009 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.509)
Philosophy of Social Science I
Philosophy of language and the basic elements of scientific method, such as the classification of the sciences, the concepts of value, cause and probability, induction and deduction, confirmation of hypotheses, and the concept of truth.
SOCI 5101 [1.0 credit] (formerly 53.511)
Research Design and Data Analysis
An integrated approach to the problems involved in the analysis of quantitative data, research design and procedures.
SOCI 5102 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.512)
Statistical Methods I
A course on multiple regression analysis, with a review of basic statistical assumptions and techniques, followed by a detailed discussion of multiple regression analysis as a statistical technique.
SOCI 5103 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.513)
Statistical Methods II
The focus will be advanced research methods. Topics will include distributions, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, and non-parametric methods. There will be an introduction to multivariate techniques, including regression and loglinear models.
SOCI 5104 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.514)
Multivariate Analysis
This course provides advanced instruction in methods and statistics. Consideration will be given to multiple regression, factor analysis, canonical analysis.
SOCI 5105 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.515)
Selected Topics in Social Research
Topic varies from year to year. Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
ANTH 5106 [0.5 credit] (formerly 54.516)
North American Native Studies
An examination of selected issues in Canadian Indian, Inuit, and Métis history. The course will explore debates over social change, cultural autonomy, native rights, and government policy.
ANTH 5107 [0.5 credit] (formerly 54.517)
Problems in North American Ethnohistory
Methodological and substantive problems in the history of Canadian native peoples. Controversies concerning the impact of European penetration and colonial policies on inter-tribal relations, cultural identity, and other aspects of native life will be explored.
ANTH 5109 [0.5 credit] (formerly 54.519)
Development, Dependency and Gender
Varieties of "development" and "dependency" theories, and feminist critiques of both, in analyzing gender relations in the Third and Fourth Worlds.
SOCI 5200 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.520)
Comparative Social Systems
Perspectives and research procedures employed by sociologists in the systematic and explicit comparison of data from two or more societies.
SOCI 5201 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.521)
Comparative Methods in Social Research
Current analytical problems and applications of comparative methods in social research. Students are expected to participate in a group research project in which one or more of these methods will be applied.
ANTH 5202 [0.5 credit] (formerly 54.522)
The Anthropology of Underdevelopment
Analysis of theoretical and historically concrete issues in the study of variable economic systems ranging from domestic subsistence and peasant production to slavery and capital-dominated markets.
SOCI 5204 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.524)
Consuming Passions: The Regulation of Consumption, Appearance and Sexuality
Examination of the rise of consumption and private pleasures and their regulation and self-regulation. (Also listed as LAWS 5008.)
SOCI 5205 [1.0 credit] (formerly 53.525)
Canadian Society
A critical examination of sociological models of modern societies and their relevance to Canada.
SOCI 5206 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.526)
Sociology of Occupations and Professions
A consideration of the development of occupational recruitment patterns and manpower problems in developed and developing areas.
SOCI 5207 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.527)
Sociology of Formal Organizations
A consideration of the forms and processes of bureaucracy in modern society, government and industry.
SOCI 5209 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.529)
Sociology of Science and Technology
Study of the interaction among science, technology and change in modern societies.
SOCI 5300 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.530)
Social Institutions I
Topic varies from year to year.
Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
SOCI 5301 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.531)
Social Institutions II
Topic varies from year to year.
Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
SOCI 5302 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.532)
The Labour Process
A consideration of the organization of work and production from feudal times to the present. The purpose of the course is to analyze the labour process in advanced capitalist societies by means of the historical comparative method.
SOCI 5303 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.533)
Sociology of Education
The relations between education and other social institutions, the structure of educational opportunity, educational systems and organizations, and the sociology of learning.
SOCI 5306 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.536)
Cultural Studies
The relations between cultural practices and other social practices in definite social formations. Discussions are grounded through the choice of specific Canadian research on topics such as media, art, music, education, pedagogy, etc.
SOCI 5307 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.537)
Psychoanalysis and Cultural Studies
This course will examine the relationship between psychoanalytic and sociological theory, focussing on the work of feminist theorists.
ANTH 5308/SOCI 5308 [0.5 credit] (formerly 54.538/53.538)
Feminist Analyses
This course surveys topics of current theory and research in recent feminist analysis. Both anthropological and sociological literature will be used.
SOCI 5309 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.539)
Cultural Theory
A survey of developments in European and North American Marxist and Post-Marxist cultural theories of the past quarter century.
SOCI 5400 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.540)
Political Sociology
An examination of theoretical and empirical work on selected aspects of the state, politics and political behaviour, primarily in North America and Europe.
ANTH 5401 [0.5 credit] (formerly 54.541)
Proseminar in Anthropology I
Anthropology as it is currently practiced at Carleton University, with a special emphasis on the anthropology of signs and symbols, North American native studies, development and underdevelopment. Required of all students during the first fall term they are in residence.
ANTH 5402 [0.5 credit] (formerly 54.542)
Proseminar in Anthropology II
Issues in the design and conduct of anthropological inquiry especially concerning proposed thesis research such as analysis of ethnographic material and development of explanatory frameworks prevailing in the discipline.
Prerequisite: Completion of ANTH 5401 or permission of the Department.
ANTH 5403 [0.5 credit] (formerly 54.543)
The Anthropology of Signs and Symbols
Various theoretical and methodological approaches to the anthropology of signs and symbols, their internal workings, and their relationship to other aspects of social life. (Also listed as RELI 5403.)
SOCI 5404 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.544)
Race, Ethnicity and Class in Contemporary Societies
Various theoretical approaches concerning the persistence and re-emergence of ethnic and/or racial groups are examined. Particular emphasis is given to the intersection and overlap of ethnicity and race with social class.
SOCI 5405 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.545)
Power and Stratification
An examination of theories of elite behaviour, social class, and ideology.
ANTH 5408 [0.5 credit] (formerly 54.548)
SOCI 5408 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.548)
Feminism and Materialism
An examination of recent attempts to develop feminist materialist theory and analyses. Substantive areas may include: the gender division of labour; family and economy; gender and class; gender, race and ethnicity; sexuality; reproduction; theory and politics.
SOCI 5409 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.549)
The Politics of Social Movements and the State
Origins, ideologies, strategies and political implications of social and popular movements in North America and Western Europe. Attention is given to the peace, feminist, gay, ecology, and anti-racist movements, as well as to the emergence of the New Right.
SOCI 5500 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.550)
Gender Formation and State Formation
The role of states in the formation of gender relations, in the context of class and race, and the production of gender as an aspect of state formation. The various levels of the state are conceived as both a site and object of gender politics.
SOCI 5504 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.554)
Selected Problems in Political Economy I
A selected topic from current research in political economy. As the topic varies from year to year, students should check with the Department regarding the current offering. (Also listed as PECO 5501 and PSCI 5501.)
SOCI 5505 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.555)
Selected Problems in Political Economy II
A selected topic from current research in political economy. As the topic varies from year to year, students should check with the Department regarding the current offering. (Also listed as PECO 5502 and PSCI 5502.)
SOCI 5600 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.560)
Critical Discourse Analysis
Examination of the relations between discourse, social semiotics, extradiscursive semiotics and social organization.
SOCI 5605 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.565)
Demographic Analysis
Intensive study of analytical strategies and techniques employed in demographic research. Attention is also given to mathematical and statistical models used in demography, which are relevant to research in other areas of sociology.
SOCI 5606 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.566)
Selected Topics in Sociology
Topic varies from year to year.
Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
SOCI 5607 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.567)
Contemporary Theories of Crime and Social Regulation
Recent developments in theories of criminality and social regulation. Particular reference will be made to the regulatory mechanisms of both public and private spheres within legal institutions, corrections, economic institutions, and the family.
SOCI 5608 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.568)
Women and Work
Issues concerning women and work, such as housework, occupational segregation, part-time work, the changing economic structure of work, wage inequality, and state policies with respect to childcare, equal pay and work of equal value, and affirmative action.
SOCI 5707 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.577)
Crime, Social Control and Social Change
An examination of the role of the discourses and ideologies surrounding crime, criminal processes, and social change. Topics may include such issues as juvenile justice, victimization, corporate crime, criminalization of indigenous peoples, substance use and abuse.
SOCI 5802 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.582)
Departmental Seminar
Topic varies from year to year. Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
SOCI 5803 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.583)
Critical Theory
Recent developments in critical theory based upon its initial formulation by the Frankfurt School, with emphasis upon particular contemporary theories in a given year, e.g., J. Habermas, H. Willems, etc.
SOCI 5804 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.584)
Modern Marxist Theory
An examination of topics of theory and research in modern Marxist literature; the central focus is on problems of class analysis, the state, and politics in advanced capitalist societies.
SOCI 5805 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.585)
Selected Topics in Sociology
Topic varies from year to year. Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
SOCI 5806 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.586)
Selected Topics in Sociology
Topic varies from year to year. Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
ANTH 5807 [0.5 credit] (formerly 54.587)
Selected Topics in the Anthropology of Signs and Symbols
Topic varies from year to year. Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
ANTH 5808 [0.5 credit] (formerly 54.588)
Selected Topics in North American Native Studies
Topic varies from year to year. Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
SOCI 5809 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.589)
The Logic of the Research Process
An examination of the research process, including the phases of conceptualization, choice of indicators, sampling, data collection, and analysis. Published articles will be studied as exemplars of the range of possible research strategies.
ANTH 5809 [0.5 credit] (formerly 54.589)
Selected Topics in the Anthropology of Development and Underdevelopment
Topic varies from year to year. Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
SOCI 5900 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.590)
Tutorial
ANTH 5900 [0.5 credit] (formerly 54.590)
Tutorial
SOCI 5905 [2.0 credits] (formerly 53.595)
Course Work Comprehensive in Sociology
Available for students in a course work M.A. who by the third term in their M.A. program have not yet completed their written and oral examinations. Completion of this course does not reduce the formal requirement of 5.0 credits.
ANTH 5905 [2.0 credits] (formerly 54.595)
Course Work Comprehensive in Anthropology
Available for students in a course work M.A. who by the third term in their M.A. program have not yet completed their written and oral examinations. Completion of this course does not reduce the formal requirement of 5.0 credits.
ANTH 5906 [0.5 credit] (formerly 54.596)
Field Seminar
This course is concerned with the conduct of directed field research, by special arrangement (for individuals or groups), to be combined with readings and papers under the supervision of a faculty member. The course may normally be taken only once in a student's program.
SOCI 5907 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.597)
Placement in Sociology
This course is required for students in the Concentration in Quantitative Methodology who have been admitted into the Cooperative Education option. This option provides an opportunity to enhance educational experience through work placement.
ANTH 5907 [0.5 credit] (formerly 54.597)
Placement in Anthropology
This course offers an opportunity to earn academic credit by engaging in research activities under the supervision of professional researchers in museums, government departments, non-governmental organizations, or other professional research settings. Placement research must be related to the preparation of the master's thesis.
SOCI 5908 [1.0 credit] (formerly 53.598)
M.A. Research Essay
Students may enrol in this course for a maximum of three consecutive terms of study, including one summer term. Students must enrol in this course not later than the beginning of the second full year of study.
SOCI 5909 [2.0 credits] (formerly 53.599)
M.A. Thesis
ANTH 5909 [2.0 credits] (formerly 54.599)
M.A. Thesis
SOCI 6000 [1.0 credit] (formerly 53.600)
Doctoral Seminar
An in-depth study of current research in sociology, including an inquiry into research techniques, conceptualization and attendant theoretical issues. This course is required of all first-year doctoral students in sociology.
SOCI 6001 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.601)
Selected Topics in Sociology
Topic varies from year to year.
Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
SOCI 6900 [0.5 credit] (formerly 53.690)
Tutorial
SOCI 6909 [7.0 credits] (formerly 53.699)
Ph.D. Thesis
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