Carleton University Canada's 
Capital University
 

Graduate Calendar Archives: 2003 / 2004

Public Policy and Administration

Dunton Tower 1021
Telephone: (613) 520-2547
Fax: (613) 520-2551
E-mail: public_administration@carleton.ca
Web Site: www.carleton.ca/sppa

The School

Director of the School: L.A. Pal

Co-ordinator, Canadian Concentration: P.A. Ryan

Co-ordinator, Development Concentration: M.A. Bienefeld

Co-ordinator, Innovation, Science and Environment Concentration: P.A. Ryan

Co-ordinator, Doctoral Program: D. Swartz

The School of Public Policy and Administration at Carleton University is a leading national and international centre for teaching and research in public administration and public policy. Since being established in 1953, the School has helped to prepare individuals for professional careers and opportunities in the public sector, both in Canada and abroad.

The nature of the public sector has always been subject to change, but perhaps never more than in recent years. Today the public sector can be seen as embracing not only the traditional government departments and agencies, but also political organizations, interest groups, consulting and research firms, the voluntary sector, organizations that provide public services on contractual bases, as well as international agencies and institutions of higher learning. The graduate programs of the School treat the public sector in this contemporary context.

The School offers graduate programs of study and research in the fields of public administration and public policy leading to the Master of Arts in Public Administration, the Graduate Diploma in Public Administration, and the Doctor of Philosophy in Public Policy. These programs are designed both for individuals who wish to work in the public sector, and for those who are already doing so but who wish to broaden or strengthen their conceptual and technical skills. Prospective applicants are urged to consider carefully the alternative programs so as to select the one best suited to their interests, background, and academic qualifications.

The M.A. program provides a broad and balanced exposure to public policy development, public management and policy implementation. The D.P.A. program provides an introduction to the same subjects. Both the M.A. and the D.P.A. are offered in three alternative areas of concentration: Canadian Public Policy and Administration (the Canadian Concentration); Development Policy and Administration (the Development Concentration); and Innovation, Science and Environment Policy and Administration (the I.S.E. Concentration). The Development Concentration is offered in co-operation with the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs.

The Ph.D. program involves the intensive study of the formation and evolution of public policy in Canada and, from a comparative perspective, in countries of the OECD.

Each of these graduate programs is described in detail below. Further information or application packages can be obtained by contacting the School of Public Administration.

Master of Arts

The overall objective of the M.A. program is to provide individuals with a balanced conceptual and technical ability to understand and contribute to policy development, public management, and policy implementation.

Under this objective, the Canadian Concentration provides an advanced understanding of the public sector through interdisciplinary insights drawn from political science, economics and management, as applied within the framework of Canadian and comparative institutions, laws and ideas. It also enables individuals to specialize in particular policy fields and aspects of management, both through study and through co-operative education in the public sector.

The Development Concentration provides an advanced understanding of the problems and opportunities that confront various types of national administrative systems and public sectors in their efforts to promote sustainable social and economic development in an increasingly interdependent and competitive global system.

The Innovation, Science and Environment Concentration provides an advanced understanding of the problems and opportunities that confront governments, firms and society in making and implementing innovation, science and environment policies in an increasingly knowledge and information-based economy and society.

These overall and particular objectives are consistent with the School's view of what is fundamental to education in the field of public administration. This view is:

  • that democratic ideals and practices are central to government and to the public sector broadly defined
  • that a balance of conceptual and technical skills is needed to understand the linked activities of policy development (how and why policy is made), public management (how the public sector is structured, staffed and resourced) and policy implementation (how policy intentions are carried out, including the grievances and appeals of citizens and clients)
  • that these advanced conceptual and technical skills come from exposure to a variety of academic disciplines
  • that professional education in public administration and policy analysis requires a balance of theory and practice

The relevance of this view has been borne out by the success of graduates of the School who now work in many areas of the public sector, in Canada and abroad, including government departments, political organizations, interest groups, consulting and research firms, the voluntary sector, international agencies, and institutions of higher learning.

A co-op option is available to full-time students in the M.A. program. Students admitted to this option must satisfactorily complete at least two work terms in order to graduate with a co-op designation on their transcripts and diplomas. These work terms are four months in duration and locate students in government departments or other organizations in order to work at a junior officer level. They provide students with opportunities to integrate the theoretical and practical aspects of public administration. During a work term, students will register in one of the co-op work term courses: PADM 5301, PADM 5302, or PADM 5303. While on a work term, students are limited to an additional 0.5 credit course.

Program Schedules

The M.A. program may be taken under three schedules: full-time, part-time or a mixture of the two.

  • The full-time schedule enables students to complete the program in two years (four or five academic terms).
  • The part-time schedule enables students, taking from two to four half credits over one year, to complete the program in five to eight years. Courses are regularly scheduled in evening sections.
  • The mixed full-time, part-time schedule enables students to complete the program in a period intermediate to those above. The mixed schedule applies to full-time students who shift to part-time study during a co-operative placement, or part-time students who shift to full-time study in the event of study leave.

The duration of the program depends upon the advanced standing with transfer of credit that students receive upon admission. Advanced standing is discussed below under program requirements.

Admission Requirements

Applicants must have a demonstrated ability to study and communicate in English. A TOEFL score of 580 or higher is normally required for students whose first language is not English.

Applicants must have a bachelor's degree (or the equivalent) with high honours standing or better from a recognized university. The level of academic performance and potential demonstrated within the degree is more important than the discipline. Indeed, students enter the program from a wide variety of academic backgrounds in the social sciences, humanities, sciences and engineering. The School also considers mid-career applicants who do not have a bachelor's degree, but who have demonstrated professional excellence over several years of managerial work in the public sector.

Applicants normally must have completed a university course covering micro- and macroeconomic theory (ECON 1000 or the equivalent), with the required standing. In addition, applicants must have a working knowledge of algebra.

Applicants to all concentrations normally must have completed a relevant political science course with the required standing.

In some cases, applicants may be admitted to the program despite not having completed one of these pre-requisite courses in economics or political science, upon the condition that the course be completed (with a grade of at least B-) in the first year of their program.

Note that, because of the number of applications received, possession of these admission requirements does not, in itself, guarantee admission to the program.

Application packages may be obtained by contacting the School of Public Policy and Administration. Applicants for full-time study who wish to be considered for financial assistance and scholarships must ensure that all application materials are received by March 1.

Program Requirements

Master of Arts

The M.A. program comprises 8.0 credits. Upon admission, students may receive advanced standing with transfer of credit for up to 3.0 required credits. Advanced standing can be granted for no more than two courses from the "outer core" (see below). Advanced standing is granted only if previous academic work is judged to be equivalent to the required courses. Advanced standing will be determined on an individual basis on consultation with the School and the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research and pursuant to Section 6.1 of the General Regulations section of this Calendar. In general, a grade of B+ or better is necessary in the equivalent courses in order to receive advanced standing.

The composition of the required and optional courses that make up the M.A. program differs between the Canadian, the Development, and the Innovation, Science and Environment (I.S.E.) Concentrations. All three concentrations involve 8.0 credits, made up of: a) an "inner core" of seven required courses (3.5 credits); b) an "outer core" of two courses (1.0 credits), chosen from a menu of five or six courses; c) seven optional courses (3.5 credits).

A. Inner Core

Concentration
        Canadian        I.S.E.          Development

        PADM 5608       PADM 5608       PADM 5608
        PADM 5300       PADM 5300       PADM 5300
        PADM 5501       PADM 5501       PADM 5501
        PADM 5203       PADM 5203       PADM 5203
        PADM 5202       PADM 5401       INAF 5307
        PADM 5607       PADM 5600       INAF 5007
        PADM 5000       PADM 5400       PADM 5001

B. Outer Core

Two courses (at least one of which must be PADM 5502 or PADM 5603) selected from:

Concentration

        Canadian        I.S.E.          Development

        PADM 5502       PADM 5502       PADM 5502
        PADM 5603       PADM 5603       PADM 5603
        PADM 5004       BUSI 5700       PADM 5107
        PADM 5204       BUSI 5701       INAF 5008
        PADM 5306       PADM 5404       PADM 5808
                        PADM 5403

C. 3.5 optional credits consisting of:

(i) 3.5 credits selected from School of Public Policy and Administration (SPPA) 5000-level course offerings, or from graduate courses in other disciplines if approved by the graduate supervisor; or
(ii) A thesis (equivalent to 2.0 credits) and 1.5 credits selected from SPPA course offerings, or from graduate courses in other disciplines, if approved by the graduate supervisor; or
(iii) A research essay (equivalent to 1.0 credit) and 2.5 credits selected from SPPA course offerings, or from graduate courses in other disciplines, if approved by the graduate supervisor.

Notes:

Normally, optional courses may only be taken only when the student has completed and/or obtained advanced standing in at least seven courses from the inner and outer cores.

Students may take as options any of the required courses over and above the minimum number specified.

Ph.D. courses are open to master's students with approval of the School.

Academic Standing

A grade of B- or better must normally be obtained in each course credited towards the master's degree. A candidate may, with the recommendation of the School of Public Policy and Administration and the approval of the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research, be allowed a grade of C+ in courses totalling 1.0 credit (with no more than .5 credit of C+ allowed in courses in the inner core).

Graduate Diploma in Public Administration

The D.P.A. program provides an introduction to the subjects of policy development, public management, and policy implementation. Students enter the program with widely varying backgrounds, including those who already have advanced degrees but who wish to strengthen or broaden their conceptual and technical skills in public administration.

Program Schedules

The D.P.A. program can be taken under three schedules; full-time, part-time or a mixture of the two. The duration of the program is approximately half that described for the M.A. program.

Admission Requirements

The requirements for admission to the Canadian, the Development and the Innovation, Science and Environment, Policy Concentrations of the D.P.A. are identical to those described for the M.A. Note, however, that students in the D.P.A. are not eligible to receive financial assistance.

Program Requirements

The D.P.A. program comprises 5.0 credits. Upon admission, students may receive advanced standing with transfer of credit for up to 1.0 credit. Advanced standing is granted only if previous academic work is judged to be equivalent to those courses. Advanced standing will be determined on an individual basis on consultation with the School and the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research and pursuant to Section 6.1 of the General Regulations section of this Calendar. In general, a grade of B+ or better is necessary in the equivalent courses in order to receive advanced standing.

The composition of courses that make up the D.P.A. program differs between the Canadian, the Development, and the Innovation Science and Environment Policy Concentrations.

Canadian Concentration
5.0 credits selected from:
PADM 5000
PADM 5004
PADM 5100
PADM 5101
PADM 5202
PADM 5203
PADM 5204
PADM 5300
PADM 5306
PADM 5501
PADM 5502
PADM 5603
PADM 5607
PADM 5608

No more than three of the courses may be selected from PADM 5004, PADM 5100, PADM 5101, PADM 5204 and PADM 5603.

Development Concentration
5.0 credits selected from:
PADM 5001
PADM 5101
PADM 5107
PADM 5203
PADM 5204
PADM 5300
PADM 5501
PADM 5502
PADM 5603
PADM 5608
PADM 5808
INAF 5007
INAF 5008
INAF 5307

No more than three of the courses may be selected from PADM 5101, PADM 5107, PADM 5204, PADM 5502, and PADM 5808.

Innovation, Science and Environment Concentration
5.0 credits selected from:
PADM 5001
PADM 5002
PADM 5008
PADM 5203
PADM 5300
PADM 5400
PADM 5401
PADM 5403
PADM 5404
PADM 5501
PADM 5502
PADM 5600
PADM 5607
PADM 5608
PADM 5807
One of Business BUSI 5700 or BUSI 5701

No more than two of the courses may be selected from PADM 5001, PADM 5002, PADM 5008, PADM 5605, PADM 5001, and PADM 5807.

Academic Standing

All candidates are required to obtain a grade of B- or better in each course in the program. A candidate may, with the recommendation of the School and the approval of the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research, be allowed one grade of C+.

Doctor of Philosophy

The doctoral program in public policy has two primary objectives:

  • to contribute to the advancement of research and teaching based on one or more of the various approaches to the political economy of public policy (in OECD countries)
  • to develop scholars and researchers for positions in universities, private research institutions, and various other public and private organizations

While the School's M.A. degree outlined above offers exposure to both policy and management, the Ph.D. focuses directly on the study of public policy from both Canadian and comparative perspectives. The formation and evolution of policy in Canada is a primary focus of the program. In addition, Canadian, European, and other international students interested in research with a European-Canadian and North American comparative perspective will also find the program conducive to their work in the fields of specialization offered. Areas of research specialization within the School include: policy institutions and instruments, industrial policy, and social and labour market policy.

A distinguishing feature of the School of Public Policy and Administration is the presence of faculty who strive to integrate political science and economics in their research and teaching. The Ph.D. program is to a considerable extent based on the view that political economy is essential to an understanding of the public sector. It is also based on the view that analyses of what governments do must address the interplay among the various policy fields, instruments, and institutions.

Degree Schedule

The program consists of three academic terms of course work plus preparation and completion of one comprehensive examination, as well as a doctoral thesis. The Ph.D. program in Public Policy normally will be undertaken on a full-time basis; however, in cases of exceptional merit, the School may accept a few candidates for the degree on a part-time basis.

Admission Requirements

Admission will be judged primarily on the applicant's ability to conduct advanced research and to complete the program successfully. Applications should contain at least one essay or paper at the M.A. level written by the applicant. Enrolment is limited and possession of the minimum requirements does not, in itself, guarantee acceptance. To be eligible for financial assistance, application for admission for the fall term must be completed no later than March 1.

Admission requires completion of an M.A. degree in any of public administration, political science, economics, political economy, business administration, law, or similar degree with first class standing (A- average or better in their M.A. work).

Students are advised that a working knowledge of basic calculus is required for completion of the program. Assistance in acquiring these skills is provided by the program. Students requiring additional assistance should consult the Ph.D. Co-ordinator.

Applicants must also successfully complete prerequisites in statistics, political science, and economics as described in detail below. These prerequisites may be satisfied by the completion of appropriate course work at the intermediate undergraduate level or higher in each of the subjects listed.

Prerequisites in political science economics and statistics must be completed prior to entry. Completed courses in political science should be approximately equivalent to PADM 5607 or PADM 5608. With permission of the Graduate Co-ordinator, this requirement may be done, as a directed study in the summer, prior to registration in the program, under the supervision of faculty in the School. Completed courses in economics should be approximately equivalent to PADM 5203. This course is usually offered at the School in the summer term and equivalent courses may be taken at most universities throughout the academic year. Completed course in statistics should be approximately equivalent to PADM 5501. Applicants should seek advice from the co-ordinator of the Ph.D. program about whether particular courses are acceptable as prerequisites.

Advanced Standing

Advanced standing will not normally be granted for any of the required courses described below. If granted, advanced standing will be limited to 1.0 credit.

Program Requirements

The program consists of the following elements:

  • 4.5 credits of course work
  • Preparation for and writing of one comprehensive examination, normally written in the summer term of the first year
  • Public defence of a written thesis proposal
  • A thesis equivalent to 5.0 credits
  • A language requirement

Course Components

Courses will normally be taken in the first year, and the fall of the second year. Students in the doctoral program are required to complete the following:

  • Six 0.5 credits: PADM 6101, PADM 6102, PADM 6103, PADM 6104, PADM 6105, PADM 6106. A GPA of 9.0 (B+) or better overall must be obtained in these courses before proceeding to the comprehensive examination.
  • PADM 6200
  • 1.0 credit that constitutes one area of specialization beyond the public policy foundations covered in the core courses. These courses will be chosen by the student after consultation with, and approval by, the student's academic supervisor and the Ph.D. Co-ordinator

These courses will normally be graduate courses offered by the School or by the Departments of Political Science and Economics, or directed studies (PADM 6901 and PADM 6902). However, other courses may be approved. Doctoral students taking courses at the master's level will be subject to enhanced course requirements. When necessary, students must arrange formal approval from the relevant department for admission to courses.

Comprehensive Examinations

Students will write a general comprehensive examination, normally in the summer term of the first year. This examination will focus primarily on material emanating from the required first year courses. At the discretion of the examining board, a candidate whose performance is not fully satisfactory may be asked to take an oral examination or a second written examination.

Preparation for the comprehensive examination will be assisted through a tutorial as described below.

Thesis

Following the successful completion of the comprehensive examinations, students will prepare a formal thesis proposal under a committee composed of the supervisor and two other faculty members. The thesis supervisor will normally be a faculty member from the School of Public Policy and Administration. Each committee normally shall consist of at least one political scientist and one economist. Under normal circumstances, the proposal must be defended by the end of the fall term of the third year of full-time registration. The thesis must demonstrate an advanced ability to integrate the politics and economics of public policy. The thesis must be defended at an oral examination.

Language Requirement

Students will be required to demonstrate a reading knowledge of French. Another language may be substituted for French, if it is essential for the thesis.

Graduate Courses

Not all of the following courses are offered in a given year. For an up-to-date statement of course offerings for 2003-2004 and to determine the term of offering, consult the Registration Instructions and Class Schedule booklet, published in the summer and also available online at www.carleton.ca/cu/programs/sched_dates/

Course Designation System

Carleton's course designation system has been restructured. The first entry of each course description below is the new alphanumeric Carleton course code, followed by its credit value in brackets. The old Carleton course number (in parentheses) is included for reference, where applicable.

PADM 5000 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.500)
Public-Sector Management and the Canadian Political System
An examination of the principles and processes of public sector management as it functions through the institutions of cabinet-parliamentary government. Both institutional reforms and changes in the philosophy of public sector management are examined in the Canadian federal government and in a comparative context.
PADM 5001 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.501)
The International Policy Framework
An examination of the international initiatives and rules within which national development policies are developed and implemented.
PADM 5002 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.502)
The Political Economy of Regulation
An examination of political, economic, legal, and organizational theories of regulation in the Canadian and comparative context, and of the processes and consequences of regulatory practice in selected Canadian public policy fields.
Prerequisite: PADM 5608.
PADM 5004 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.504)
Implementation, Service Delivery, and Compliance
An examination of the theory and practice of policy implementation, service delivery, and compliance in relation to Canadians as citizens and customers.
PADM 5006 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.506)
Social Movements, Interests and the Policy Process
An examination of the roles of social movements and interests in the policy process in a Canadian and comparative context.
PADM 5007 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.507)
Comparative Research on Policy and Policy Management
An examination of methodologies and issues of comparative research on policy and public management among and between developed and developing countries.
PADM 5008 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.508)
Environmental Policy
An examination of Canadian environmental policies and programs set in a comparative political-economic and institutional context. Also offered at the undergraduate level, with difference requirements, as PADM 4008, for which additional credit is precluded.
PADM 5009 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.509)
Health Policy
An examination of Canadian health policies and programs set in a comparative political-economic and institutional context. Also offered at the undergraduate level, with different requirements, as PADM 4009, for which additional credit is precluded.
PADM 5100 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.510)
Management Accounting
An introduction to the principles and concepts of financial and management accounting. Illustrations of how accounting data can assist in the decision-making process of private and public organizations, and the limitations of that data.
PADM 5101 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.511)
Financial Management
An introduction to several concepts and techniques relevant to obtaining long term funds (debt and equity), and to comparing alternative uses of those funds (NPV and IRR). Other topics may include: financial ratios; pension management; and derivative contracts.
PADM 5103 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.513)
Budget Decision Making and Budgeting
A study of selected aspects of the expenditure and revenue budget and budgetary process at all levels of government. Student papers are oriented towards critical review of actual budgets and budgetary processes.
Prerequisites: PADM 5203 and PADM 5608
PADM 5105 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.515)
Management in the Public Service
An examination through cases and research of selected problems and issues in public service management. The specific focus of the course will change each year; some topics include human resources management, government investment, and pricing decisions.
PADM 5106 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50. 516)
Urban and Local Government Management
An analysis of the principal issues and processes of Canadian urban and local government management and administration.
PADM 5107 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.517)
Project Management
An examination of the managerial, organizational and financial issues and processes involved in the development and implementation of development projects.
PADM 5109 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.519)
Management in the Para-Public Sector
An examination of managerial theory and practice in the para-public sector including voluntary organizations, interest groups, state-owned and mixed enterprises, and partnership arrangements.
PADM 5200 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.520)
Public-Sector Investment and Pricing
An examination of theory and practice related to decision making about public-sector investment and pricing policy, particularly large-scale projects and programs. Applied cost-benefit analysis (discount rates, marginal cost and shadow pricing, and the handling of risk and uncertainty) in large-scale public investment choices.
Prerequisite: PADM 5203.
PADM 5202 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.522)
Macroeconomics for Management and Policy
Introductory knowledge of macroeconomics is presumed (subjects such as aggregate supply and demand, and concepts such as the multiplier). Contemporary macroeconomic issues (including active short-run stabilization policy, long-run growth, deficits and debt) and the conceptual frameworks available to analyze these issues.
PADM 5203 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.523)
Microeconomics for Management and Policy
Introductory knowledge of microeconomics is presumed (subjects such as the competitive model and concepts such as elasticity). Consumer and producer theory, and certain exceptions to the competitive model that are particularly relevant to public policy (including externalities, public goods, imperfect competition).
PADM 5204 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.524)
Applied Microeconomic Policy Analysis
An examination of how microeconomic theory can be applied to analyze actual public policy problems and issues.
Prerequisite: PADM 5203.
PADM 5205 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.525)
The Canadian Economy
An overview of Canadian economic development and how it has been affected by governments. Topics may be drawn from monetary, fiscal, industrial, trade, labour-market or competition policies, viewed in contemporary and historical contexts.
Prerequisites: PADM 5202 and PADM 5203.
PADM 5208 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.528)
Management Information Systems
An examination of the fundamentals of MIS: the nature of systems, information, and management processes, including concepts of data-processing technology, systems design, organizational impacts of information systems, and hardware and software considerations.
PADM 5300 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.530)
Organization Theory
Major theoretical approaches to the study of organizations, including bureaucratic theory, scientific management, human relations, class theory and gender theory. Developments such as technology and organization, total quality management, empowerment and demo-cratization strategies, and quality of working life.
Prerequisite: PADM 5000 or the equivalent.
PADM 5301 (formerly 50.531)
Co-operative Work Term
Prerequisites: Registration in the Co-operative Education Option of the Master of Arts program and permission of the School.
PADM 5302 (formerly 50.532)
Co-operative Work Term
Prerequisites: Registration in the Co-operative Education Option of the Master of Arts program and permission of the School.
PADM 5303 (formerly 50.533)
Co-operative Work Term
Prerequisites: Registration in the Co-operative Education Option of the Master of Arts program and permission of the School.
PADM 5306 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.536)
Law of Public Authorities I
The legal environment of Canadian public administration, Canadian law, institutions and processes. Introduction to Canadian legal history, adversarial adjudicative procedure, delegating power to public authorities. Criminal prohibition and licensing to influence behaviour, procedural justice in government decision making, controls on public authorities, enforcement of ethics.
PADM 5307 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.537)
Law of Public Authorities II
Examines the characteristics and selected problems of control of administrative action. Topics include: varieties of traditional and constitutional, legal and judicial control, impact of the Charter, reforms to administrative law control systems in Canada, and comparisons with developments outside Canada. Precludes credit for LAWS 4507.
Prerequisite: PADM 5306.
PADM 5308 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.538)
The Management of Provincial Government
A comparative analysis of public-sector management structures and processes at the provincial level of government. Topics examined include personnel and financial systems, regional administration, public utilities, direct interprovincial program and project management, and international activities of provinces.
Prerequisite: PADM 5000 or the equivalent.
PADM 5400 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.540)
Science and Technology Policies
An examination of theory and practice regarding governmental policies for science and technology, and regarding the use of scientific or objective knowledge in the policy and regulatory processes of government. The course examines concerns regarding the ethical issues and the transparency of science in government.
PADM 5401 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.541)
Technology, Firms and Systems of Innovation
An examination of broad theories of the political economy of technological change. Such theories include those informed by neo-classical economics, recent evolutionary economic and institutionally oriented innovation studies.
PADM 5403 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.543)
Science, Risk and Evaluation
An examination of risk-benefit theories and practices and related issues in the evaluation of science and technology; including how they are handled in applied regulatory and policy institutions in selected sectors (e.g. pesticides; health protection; biotechnology).
PADM 5404 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.544)
The Nature of Science
An examination for non-scientists of key ideas and concepts of science crucial to understanding science as an intellectual activity and experimental process. Ideas and concepts are linked to key areas where policy must have a scientific underpinning (e.g. ecosystems, energy and resources, biotechnology, biodiversity and radiation).
PADM 5501 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.551)
Quantitative Methods I
An introduction to: descriptive statistics which are used to summarize information; probability theory and sampling distributions, which permit researchers to make valid predictions about population parameters from sample statistics; and the testing of hypotheses about quantitative and qualitative population parameters.
PADM 5502 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.552)
Quantitative Methods II
The use of correlation and regression analyses to test hypotheses about the relationships between social-economic variables. The course covers simple-linear and multiple regression techniques, the underlying assumptions of ordinary least squares regression, and what can be done when some of these assumptions are violated.
Prerequisite: PADM 5501.
PADM 5509 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.559)
Tax Policy
An examination of Canadian tax policies set in a comparative political-economic and institutional context. Also offered at the undergraduate level, with different requirements, as PADM 4509, for which additional credit is precluded.
PADM 5600 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.560)
Industrial Policy, Innovation and Sustainable Development
An examination of sustainable development ideas and their Canadian and comparative industrial policy and corporate innovation. Precludes credit for PADM 4600.
PADM 5602 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.562)
Planning and Evaluation in Government I
An examination of selected concepts, issues, and processes in applied governmental planning and evaluation, utilizing both Canadian and comparative experiences.
PADM 5603 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.563)
Qualitative Research in Public Organizations
Methods used in qualitative social research. The topics covered include the formulation of research problems, research design and techniques for collecting and managing non-quantitative evidence, and the role of qualitative research in the analysis of public policies and programs.
Prerequisite: PADM 5602.
PADM 5604 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.564)
Social Policy
A seminar which will study the nature and historical development of social programs in capitalist countries, with particular focus on Canada. The course will concentrate on developing a critical understanding of the social forces shaping these programs. Precludes credit for PADM 4604.
PADM 5607 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.567)
Political Economy of the State
Theories of the modern state, drawing on different political economy traditions (for example, liberal, institutional, Marxist, feminist). Central debates that have shaped the state in the past, and that are shaping it for the future.
PADM 5608 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.568)
Policy and Decision Making
An examination of policy analysis: definition, design, implementation, evaluation. Formal institutional structures and processes of policy formulation and implementation, theoretical issues concerning how policy is grounded in an understanding of the state, democracy and citizenship.
Prerequisites: PADM 5000 or the equivalent and PADM 5607.
PADM 5609 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.569)
Economic Models of Politics
An introduction to the application of microeconomic conceptual frameworks to political processes. Topics may include: types of market failure; interest group formation; collective choice mechanisms; the influence of legislative institutions on policy outcomes; principal-agent relationships and the bureaucracy.
Prerequisite: PADM 5203
PADM 5700 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.570)
Policy Seminar
An examination of one or more selected policy areas. The focus will be an analytical assessment of the selected policy area in terms of its many-sided economic, political, social, legal, quantitative, and administrative complexities. The policy field will change each year.
PADM 5701 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.571)
Gender and Public Policy
How policy and policy making shape, and are shaped by gender relations in the family and the labour market. Topics covered may include gender inequalities in earnings and employment, macroeconomic policy, gender and development, gender-based analysis. Precludes credit for PADM 4701.
PADM 5702 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.572), PADM 5703 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.573)
Policy Seminars
Examination of one or more selected policy areas. Analytical assessment of the selected policy area in terms of its economic, political, social, legal, quantitative, and administrative complexities. The policy field will change each year.
PADM 5704 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.574)
Regional Policy
Theory and practice of regional policy - Canadian and Third World experience. Regionalism and regional economic concerns, alternative policy approaches, a critical review of Canadian efforts with emphasis on how federalism shapes perceptions of regional issues and influences the approach to solutions. Precludes credit for PADM 4704.
PADM 5705 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.575)
Advanced Statistical Policy Analysis
An examination of econometric research on selected policy issues. The issues considered vary each year and the analysis incorporates the study of selected econometric techniques. The course enables students to evaluate critically applied econometric studies of public policy.
PADM 5801 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.581)
Human Resources Management
Introduction to the field of human resources management including the roles of human resource departments, employee motivation, staffing, compensation, benefits, training and development and employee relations.
PADM 5804 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.584)
Industrial Relations and Public Sector Collective Bargaining
Analysis of the basic concepts of industrial relations, with respect to both public- and private-sector employees and organizations.
PADM 5806 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.586)
Aboriginal Policy
Canadian policies and programs on aboriginal peoples and aboriginal peoples' own policies as nations set in a comparative political-economic and institutional context. Also offered at the undergraduate level, with different requirements, as PADM 4806, for which additional credit is precluded.
PADM 5807 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.587)
Trade Policy
Canadian multilateral and regional trade policies and programs set in a comparative political-economic and institutional context. Also offered at the undergraduate level, with different requirements, as PADM 4807, for which additional credit is precluded.
PADM 5808 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.588)
Structural Adjustment Policy
An examination of structural adjustment policies and programs with a comparative focus on developing countries, but also including their relations with developed countries.
PADM 5809 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.589)
Education Policy
An examination of Canadian policies and programs on education set in a comparative political-economic and institutional context. Also offered at the undergraduate level, with different requirements, as PADM 4809, for which additional credit is precluded.
PADM 5901 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.591)
Directed Studies
A tutorial or directed reading course on selected subjects.
PADM 5902 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.592)
Directed Studies
A tutorial or directed reading course on selected subjects.
PADM 5903 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.593)
Directed Studies
A tutorial or directed reading course on selected subjects.
PADM 5907 [1.0 credit] (formerly 50.597)
Special Project in Development Administration
PADM 5908 [[1.0 credit] (formerly 50.598)
Research Essay
PADM 5909 [2.0 credits] (formerly 50.599)
M.A. Thesis
PADM 6101 [0.5 credit]
Public Policy Research I
Selected epistemological issues as these pertain to public policy research. Issues of research design, and the use of qualitative methods of data collection and analysis in the study of public policy.
Precludes additional credit for PADM 6100.
PADM 6102 [0.5 credit]
Markets, Prices and Government
The contributions and limitations of microeconomic theory for analyzing the behaviour of public and private decision makers. Issues include different forms of market failure, and different understandings of the appropriate role of government in addressing them.
Precludes additional credit for PADM 6008.
PADM 6103 [0.5 credit]
State, Economy and Society
The historical and contemporary role of the state. Issues addressed include the expansion of a global capitalist economy and concomitant technological developments; the rise of domestic and transnational advocacy groups; and the role of identity as the basis for political engagement. Precludes additional credit for PADM 6006.
PADM 6104 [0.5 credit]
Public Policy Research II
Quantitative methods relevant to public policy research, including the use of simple linear and multiple regression techniques to test hypotheses. Issues addressed include the assumptions underlying ordinary least squares regression, and what can be done when these assumptions are violated.
Precludes additional credit for PADM 5502.
PADM 6105 [0.5 credit]
Policy Institutions and Processes
Economic and political science approaches to the role of ideas, interests and institutions in the public policy process and instrument choice. Topics may include: policy paradigms and political culture; interest groups; theories of state formation; behavior of bureaucracies and legislative institutions.
Precludes additional credit for PADM 6005 and PADM 6007.
PADM 6106 [0.5 credit]
Public Policy Analysis
The application of economic and political science approaches to public policy analysis in Canadian and comparative settings. The policy fields examined may include social welfare and labour market policy, tax and trade policy, science policy and environment policy.
Precludes additional credit for PADM 6004 and PADM 6009.
PADM 6200 [0.5 credit]
Doctoral Seminar
eneral issues involved in developing research proposals and conducting public policy research. Required for second year doctoral students who present their dissertation proposals. The course includes presentations of current research by senior doctoral students and faculty. Graded Pass/Fail.
PADM 6900 [1.0 credit] (formerly 50.690)
Ph.D. Tutorial
A tutorial specifically designed as preparation for the general comprehensive examination, under the direction of two or more faculty members. The grade to be awarded will be that obtained on the general written examination.
PADM 6901 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.691)
Ph.D. Specialization Tutorial
A Ph.D. tutorial covering advanced theory and research in an area of specialization generally related to public policy. Specific topics will be selected in consultation with, and must be approved by, the academic supervisor and Ph.D. co-ordinator.
PADM 6902 [0.5 credit] (formerly 50.692)
Ph.D. Specialization Tutorial
A Ph.D. tutorial covering advanced theory and research in an area of specialization generally related to public policy. Specific topics will be selected in consultation with, and must be approved by, the academic supervisor and Ph.D. co-ordinator.
PADM 6909 [5.0 credits] (formerly 50.699)
Ph.D. Thesis
Students will normally be supervised by faculty in the School of Public Administration but may also seek supervision from faculty in other social sciences departments, schools, and institutes.
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