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Graduate Calendar Archives: 2003 / 2004

Psychology

Loeb Building B555
Telephone: (613) 520-4017
Fax: (613) 520-3667 Web site: www.carleton.ca/psychology

The Department

Chair of the Department: John Logan

Supervisor of Graduate Studies: Warren Thorngate

The Department of Psychology offers programs of study and research on a full-time and part-time basis, leading to the degrees of M.A., M.Sc. and Ph.D. Financial support is available, but is limited to full-time students.

There is a very close link in the Department of Psychology between graduate studies and research. Research in the Department is distributed across the life sciences areas of behavioural neuroscience, animal learning, perception, and cognition, and across the social sciences areas of social and developmental psychology. Its research and graduate program in behavioural neuroscience is one of the strongest in Canada, with current research focusing on problems of the neurochemistry of stress and learning; developmental psychopharmacology; experimental models of epilepsy; neurodegeneration; dementia; neural mechanisms of audition; drug dependence; and the effects in animals and humans of prenatal alcohol and drug exposure on postnatal behaviour. The Department has related human neuropsychological research activities dealing with alterations to visual and auditory psychophysical functions associated with neuropathological conditions. In recent years, there has been a growth of activity in aspects of applied psychology, including evaluation research; corrections; education; impact of computer and telecommunications technology; behavioural medicine; and psychological assessment. This has fostered close collaborative contacts between the Department and public service and applied settings in Ottawa, such as the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, the Royal Ottawa Hospital, the National Research Council, Department of Communications (Canada), Ontario Ministry of Correctional Services, and the Ottawa-Carleton Board of Education. Practica and internships are available in many of these settings to students at the doctoral level.

Because of the breadth of interests in the Department, there is an emphasis in graduate courses on methodological and conceptual issues that are applicable across research specializations. Consequently, most substantive courses, regardless of title, are relevant to most students' programs. Students typically work closely with their advisers who, through informal tutorials and directed studies and independent research courses, provide much of the opportunity for specialized study. Applicants are strongly encouraged to write directly to faculty members for more specific details on research interests and programs underway.

As part of its general experimental program, the Department provides the opportunity to pursue a concentration at the master's and doctoral level in behavioural neuroscience (a collaborative specialization with the University of Ottawa), human neuropsychology, or human information systems. Applicants should consult with the supervisor of graduate studies for information on structuring a doctoral program of studies within a concentration.

Through a quantitative methods requirement, completion of a demanding empirical thesis presented and defended orally, participation in small seminars, and a close relationship with faculty advisers and students, the master's programs provide the opportunity for a refinement of critical, logical, and analytical skills; skills of written and oral expression; understanding of the strengths and limitations of the scientific method as a means of problem solving, demonstrated through psychology but applicable to issues in society at large; an understanding of quantification and scaling; the use of statistical methods and inference; and the use of evidence to support argument. For some students this is a satisfactory and satisfying end in itself. For others, it provides a solid preparation for the doctoral program in which original independent study and research is stressed. The Department does not distinguish between an applied and an experimental program; instead, the basic orientation is experimental and theoretical, but with opportunities, where appropriate, to provide complementary experience necessary to work successfully as a psychologist in applied research/service settings.

Augmenting the well-equipped laboratories expected in an active research environment, the Department of Psychology receives excellent technical support from the Carleton University Science Technology Centre, where design and manufacture of special-purpose apparatus is carried out. In addition, the workshops provide technical support for the more than twenty-five computer systems in use throughout the Department's laboratories.

In fulfilling degree credit requirements, all graduate students are required to demonstrate competence in statistical and quantitative methods through successful completion of PSYC 5400 (with a grade of B- or better) or a qualifying examination. The qualifying examination is ordinarily scheduled during the first part of September, just prior to the registration period, and it encompasses the material covered in PSYC 5400. In the event of successful completion of the examination, another course is substituted for PSYC 5400. In the case of M.A. students, the Department may recommend that a grade of C+ in PSYC 5400 be accepted for credit (General Regulations, Section 11.2) only after successful completion of the qualifying examination. This option is limited to those who pass the examination within two successive offerings of it, and who maintain continuous registration as graduate students between the first registration in PSYC 5400 and the taking of the examination.

In addition to fulfilling the remaining credit requirements as described in subsequent sections, all graduate students in psychology are expected to conduct research of interest to them during each year of graduate study. This requirement may be satisfied by independent research, serving as a research assistant, or by doing pilot or thesis research.

Each year, the candidate's adviser submits a written critique of research progress, and this becomes part of the candidate's permanent record. Qualifying-year students are evaluated at the end of the first twelve months.

Depending on his/her field of concentration, a candidate may be required to demonstrate an ability to read with understanding relevant technical material in a foreign language and/or to give satisfactory evidence of competence in such areas as computer techniques, electronic instrumentation, psychometrics, sampling procedures, or surgical techniques.

The Department may recommend that a graduate student be asked to withdraw from the program at any time if his or her progress in course work, research, or comprehensive examinations proves unsatisfactory.

Within the Department exist subgroups of faculty members with common interests and subgroups of courses associated with particular areas of psychology. Below are listed four formally identified fields of concentration, with the work that would be expected from any student who decided to pursue interests in one of these fields.

Concentrations

Basic and Applied Social Psychology
The Concentration in Basic and Applied Social Psychology is designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge in the traditional fields of social psychology such as: social psychological research methods; attitudes and personality; the application of social psychology to current social issues such as family violence; health promotion, assessment and program evaluation; crime and delinquency; computers and the psychology of women. Faculty interests span a broad spectrum of perspectives in social, personality, community and applied social psychology. Current research in the Department includes historical and critical social psychology, laboratory investigations of social processes in decision making and attitudes through applied studies in areas such as family violence, women and the work force, the psychology of women, delinquency, criminal justice and corrections, health promotion, and performance enhancement.

Students interested in this area are encouraged to take courses such as PSYC 5100, PSYC 5101, PSYC 5109 and PSYC 5406, as well as generate theses in this area.

Concentration in Cognitive Psychology
The Concentration in Cognitive Psychology is intended to provide the graduate student with an advanced knowledge of methodological and theoretical issues in the domain of cognitive psychology. Research interests of regular and adjunct faculty in cognition include perception and psychophysics, attention, pattern recognition, reading and language processing, cognitive development, learning and memory, problem solving, neuropsychology, and human-computer interactions. Students interested in this area are encouraged to take courses such as PSYC 5700, PSYC 5703, PSYC 5704 and PSYC 6700 and generate theses in the area of cognition.
Concentration in Developmental Psychology
The Concentration in Developmental Psychology is intended to provide graduate students with an in-depth knowledge of the theoretical and methodological issues associated with the study of child development from birth to adolescence. Faculty interests span the areas of language, cognitive, and social development. Current research in the Department includes topics related to literacy acquisition; bilingualism; peer relationships, aggression and shyness; learning disabilities; conduct disorders and antisocial behaviours; and consequences of offspring exposed prenatally to drugs. Students interested in this area are encouraged to take courses such as PSYC 5501, PSYC 5502, PSYC 6500, and PSYC 6501. Also it is expected that students in this field will generate a thesis in the area of developmental psychology.
Concentration in Human-Computer Interaction
The Concentration in Human-Computer Interaction is designed to provide students with skills to conceive, conduct and report research that improves the usefulness and usability of computer and communication technologies. Examples include the creation and evaluation of human-computer interfaces, the use of psychological principles in the design of interactive technologies, and studies of the social effects of computer-mediated communication. To pursue the Concentration, students are encouraged to take at least three of PSYC 5105, PSYC 5106, PSYC 6105 and PSYC 6106, take additional courses in related areas (e.g., cognition, social psychology, design) and complete a thesis in the area.
Specialization in Behavioural Neuroscience
Behavioural Neuroscience is the study of the relation between behaviour and the nervous system. This specialty is cross-disciplinary, incorporating neuroanatomy, neurobiology, neuropharmacology, neurophysiology, psychiatry, psychology and cognitive studies. While individual researchers usually specialize in a particular area, behavioural neuroscientists must also be able to appreciate significant research in other fields of neuroscience.
Training in Behavioural Neuroscience extends beyond the boundaries of traditional departments. This area of concentration is offered as a collaborative Specialization in Behavioural Neuroscience by the Institute of Neuroscience at Carleton University and the School of Psychology at the University of Ottawa. Faculty members of the Institute of Neuroscience are from the Psychology and Biology departments and also include adjuncts from the large and diverse Ottawa Neuroscience community. To augment the scope of training provided, faculty members from the Department of Psychiatry (Institute of Mental Health Research, Royal Ottawa Hospital) also participate in the teaching, research training and student supervision. Further details on the Specialization, including faculty members of the Institute of Neuroscience and program requirements of the Specialization are listed in the Neuroscience section of this Calendar. Prospective students are encouraged to contact the Director of the Institute of Neuroscience for current research activities of the participating faculty.

Qualifying-Year Program

Occasionally, candidates with exceptional promise who offer less than Honours B.A. status may be admitted to a qualifying-year program approved by the graduate studies committee and designed to prepare them for master's study. A grade of B- or better must be obtained in each qualifying-year course, and candidates may be required to complete satisfactorily the equivalent of a B.A.(Honours) thesis.

Master of Arts

Admission Requirements

The normal requirement for admission into the master's program is a B.A.(Honours, in Psychology) (or its equivalent) with high honours standing and with credit in the following areas: statistics and design of experiments; experimental psychology; learning or motivation; physiology and/or comparative psychology; and history and/or systems.

Candidates with particular course deficiencies may be required to register in additional courses at Carleton.

The deadline for submitting applications for graduate study in psychology are as follows: February 1 for students requesting financial assistance; June 1 for students not requesting financial assistance but who are seeking admission in September; and November 1 for students not requesting financial assistance who are seeking admission in January.

Program Requirements

The master's program usually consists of 3.0 credits, of which at least two must be at the graduate level (numbered 5000 or higher), and a thesis (equivalent to 2.0 credits) which must be defended at an oral examination. PSYC 5400, or the successful completion of the opting-out examination in quantitative methods, is required of all graduate students. Course credit will not be given for successful completion of the opting-out examination.

Master of Science

The Department of Psychology offers the M.Sc. degree for those students in the behavioural neuroscience specialization. For the neuroscience specialization, the candidate must fulfil the normal program requirements together with the requirements of the specialization. For further details, see the Neuroscience section of this Calendar.

Academic Standing

A grade of B- or better is normally required in each of the credits counted towards the M.A. or M.Sc. degree. The Department is prepared on occasion to recommend to the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research that a candidate be allowed a grade of C+ in 1.0 credit or each of two 0.5 credits. In the case of PSYC 5400, such a recommendation will be based on successful completion of the qualifying examination. This option is limited to those who pass the examination within two successive offerings of it, and who maintain continuous registration as graduate students between the first registration in PSYC 5400 and the taking of the examination.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission Requirements

The requirements for admission to the Ph.D. program are outlined in the General Regulations section of this Calendar. Scores on the Graduate Record Examination are optional.

The Ph.D. program in psychology normally will be undertaken on a full-time basis; however, in cases of exceptional merit, the Department will accept a few candidates for the degree on a part-time basis. The time limit for completion of Ph.D. degree requirements for those who enter the program on a part-time basis will be the same as for those who enter on a full-time basis and subsequently register for part-time study: that is, eight calendar years. (See General Regulations, Section 13, Time Limits.)

Applicants should note that of the B.A., M.A., M.Sc., and Ph.D. degrees in Psychology, ordinarily only two may be taken at Carleton University.

Program Requirements

The minimum program requirements for the Ph.D. degree in Psychology are as follows:

  • 10.0 credits, with a grade of B- or better in each credit;
  • PSYC 5400 (1.0 credit) or the opting-out examination; and one of PSYC 5401,
  • PSYC 5402, PSYC 5403 or PSYC 5406 or other as approved by the graduate committee are required of all Ph.D. graduate students. In the case of success in the opting-out examination in PSYC 5400, another 1.0 credit is substituted;
  • Satisfactory completion of PSYC 6905 (1.0 credit);
  • A thesis equivalent to 5.0 of the required 10.0 credits which must be defended at an oral examination.

All Ph.D. candidates are required to submit a thesis prospectus. The prospectus examination will normally be successfully completed within seven calendar terms of the student's initial registration for full-time students and ten terms for part-time students.

Comprehensive Examination

All Ph.D. candidates in psychology are required to successfully complete PSYC 6905, Comprehensive Examination (1.0 credit). The Comprehensive examination includes both a written and an oral examination on a topic distinct from the topic of the thesis. The topic of the comprehensive examination shall be approved by the graduate studies committee of the Department of Psychology. There are two optional forms for the written and the oral examination: either a major essay or a research grant proposal. The submission of the written portion of the examination will be followed within one to three weeks by a comprehensive oral examination, which is not restricted to issues raised by the written portion.

The comprehensive examination must be completed successfully before the Ph.D. prospectus meeting is scheduled. Students are required to successfully complete the Comprehensive Examination by the end of the fourth term of the student's initial registration for full-time students in the Ph.D. program or by the end of the sixth term of the student's initial registration in the part-time Ph.D. program.

Graduate Courses

Not all of the following courses are offered in a given year. For an up-to-date statement of course offerings for 2003-2004 and to determine the term of offering, consult the Registration Instructions and Class Schedule booklet, published in the summer and also available online at www.carleton.ca/cu/programs/sched_dates/

Course Designation System

Carleton's course designation system has been restructured. The first entry of each course description below is the new alphanumeric Carleton course code, followed by its credit value in brackets. The old Carleton course number (in parentheses) is included for reference, where applicable.

PSYC 5001 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.501)
Qualitative Research Methods in Psychology
Introduction to various non-numerical, interpretive research methods. Attention will be devoted to the philosophical underpinnings of qualitative research, methods collecting and analyzing qualitative data, and issues regarding sampling, reliability, and validity.
Prerequisite: PSYC 5400 or permission from the instructor.
PSYC 5010 [0.5 credit]
Social Psychology Methodology
An overview of research methods for the study of social and organizational psychology. Topics may include observational and interview techniques, archival methods, questionnaire design, focus groups, qualitative analyses, and computer simulation. A research project will be required.
PSYC 5011 [0.5 credit]
Social Psychology I
Discussion of recent developments in social psychology theory and research. Topics may include social cognition, social influence, group processes, conflict resolution and social change.
PSYC 5012 [0.5 credit]
Organizational Psychology I
Discussion of recent developments in organizational psychology and research. Topics may include personnel selection, work motivation, morale and productivity, organizational decision making, leadership and social action.
PSYC 5021 [0.5 credit]
Forensic Assessment
Theoretical and empirical issues of the biopsychosocial antecedents of criminal behaviour. Classification and assessment of offenders for courts, probation and parole services will be reviewed. Risk assessment, management and service planning are addressed in both correctional and mental health contexts.
PSYC 5022 [0.5 credit]
Adult Offenders
Theoretical and empirical issues on the use of different types of interventions in modifying adult criminal behaviour. Institutional treatment and community-based approaches are discussed.
PSYC 5023 [0.5 credit]
Witnesses, Victims and Juries
A review of research and theory concerning eyewitnesses, victims of crime, and jury decision-making. Topics such as police interviewing techniques and practices, eyewitness identification and testimony, victim rights, effects and outcomes, and influences on jury verdicts are discussed.
PSYC 5024 [0.5 credit]
Youthful Offenders
An examination of the development of delinquency with a focus on etiology, risk factors, assessment, prediction, and developmental trajectories. Individual, group, and family institutional and community treatment approaches are examined.
PSYC 5104 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.514)
Psychology of Women
This seminar will consider and evaluate research concerning the psychology of women, including research methods, gender roles and gender differences.
PSYC 5105 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.515)
Fundamentals of Computing for Psychologists
A survey of computer and communication hardware and software. The course is designed to make psychologists aware of concepts and terminology used by engineers and programmers in planning computer applications. The course will have a weekly laboratory.
Prerequisite: one course in computer programming or equivalent.
PSYC 5106 [0.5 credit]
Computers and Cognition
A survey of literature in such fields as artificial intelligence, database management, computer-aided instruction, simulation and forecasting, and computer-mediated communication. Psychological principles in the design, use, and evaluation of these cognitive aids are stressed.
PSYC 5107 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.517)
Psychology of Family Violence
In this seminar, students examine the biopsychosocial antecedents and consequences of the abuse and neglect of children, partners and elders within the family. The efficacy of preventive and treatment strategies is also assessed, as are current controversies and research methods in the area.
PSYC 5108 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.518)
Social Psychological Issues in Human Assessment
A detailed critique of orthodox assessment methodologies and exposure to recent developments in the appraisal of human competencies, personality, and social interaction.
PSYC 5109 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.519)
Historical and Social Foundations of Social Psychology
History of psychological social psychology (1890s to 1960s), with emphasis on the development of social psychology as both an experimental and an interpretive science. Some attention is given to historiographic issues and the history of the human sciences generally.
PSYC 5200 [1.0 credit] (formerly 49.520 ) (Biology 61.534)
Basics of Neuroscience
A comprehensive neuroscience course from cellular levels to neural systems and behavior. Topics covered include aspects of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neuropharmacology and behavioural and cognitive neuroscience. (Also listed as PSY 6201 at the University of Ottawa.)
PSYC 5209 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.529)
Psychology of Health and Illness
A critical examination of scientific theory and research on the role of psychological factors in health and illness, and the use of psychological interventions in treating illness and maintaining health. Topics include the biopsychological model of illness, stress and coping, psychoneuroimmunology, personality, and stress management.
PSYC 5300 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.530)
Perceptual Processes
Theoretical and empirical issues of the area of perception. Topics may include: psychophysics, constancies, depth perception, pattern recognition, iconic memory, attention, hemispheric specialization.
PSYC 5301 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.531)
Psychophysics
A study of classic and contemporary psychophysical methods. Applications to cognition will be included.
PSYC 5400 [1.0 credit] (formerly 49.540)
Quantitative Psychology I: Univariate Techniques
Applications of the general linear model including analysis of variance and multiple regression: prediction and estimation. Extensive use is made of computer statistical packages.
PSYC 5401 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.541)
Quantitative Psychology II: Multivariate Techniques
Applications of multivariate statistical techniques with psychological data including multivariate analysis of variance, canonical correlation, discriminant function analysis, and factor analysis. Extensive use is made of computer statistical packages.
Prerequisite: PSYC 5400.
PSYC 5402 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.542)
Descriptive and Nonparametric Statistics
An overview of methods for assisting in the detection and explanation of patterns in data that do not satisfy parametric test assumptions. Topics may include exploratory data analysis, information analysis, prediction analysis, ordinal pattern analysis, and conceptual issues in statistics.
Prerequisite: PSYC 5400.
PSYC 5403 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.543)
Measurement and Scaling: Theory, Methods, and Applications
Theoretical foundations and applications of extensive, conjoint, difference, utility and subjective probability, fundamental measurement systems are studied. Data theory, derived measurement systems, multidimensional scaling of similarities and preference data, and the related computer based routines are also explored.
Prerequisite: PSYC 5400.
PSYC 5406 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.546)
Quasi-experimental Design and Evaluation Research
Coverage of methodological and statistical problems occurring in the field settings and program evaluations.
Prerequisites: PSYC 5400, and one of PSYC 5401, PSYC 5402, PSYC 5403.
PSYC 5407 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.547)
Tests and Measurements I: Intellectual/Cognitive
This course is designed to assist students learning of basic cognitive/intellectual assessment procedures. Students will be required to administer and interpret a variety of tests such as the WAIS-R, Weschler Memory Scale, Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, and Buschke's Cued Recall Test.
Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in testing or psychometrics.
PSYC 5408 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.548)
Tests and Measurements II: Personality
This course is designed to assist students learning of basic projective and non-projective personality tests. Students will be required to administer and interpret a variety of personality tests such as MMPI, Rorschach, 16-PF, and STAI. Applied experience will be stressed.
Prerequisite: PSYC 5407.
PSYC 5501 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.551)
Developmental Psychology I
A detailed examination of selected issues in developmental psychology.
PSYC 5502 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.552)
Developmental Psychology II
A continuation of PSYC 5501.
PSYC 5601 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.561)
Contemporary Research in Personality
Current controversial issues in personality research, and selected theoretical and research studies in personality.
PSYC 5700 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.570)
Advanced Topics in Cognition I
An in-depth study of a specific topic in the area of basic cognitive processes. Topics will vary from year to year and may include judgmental processes, object identification, selective attention and spatial cognition.
PSYC 5703 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.573)
Cognition I
A survey of issues and research methodologies in basic cognitive processes. Topics may include detection and processing of sensory signals, pattern recognition, attention, mental imagery and automaticity.
PSYC 5704 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.574)
Cognition II
A survey of issues and research methodologies in higher-level cognitive processes. Topics may include memory, representation of knowledge, decision processes, and the procedural/declarative controversy. The course may be focused on a particular area (e.g. reading, transfer in problem solving).
PSYC 5800 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.580)
Special Topics in Psychology
The topics of this course will vary from year to year, and will be announced in advance of the registration period.
PSYC 5900 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.590)
Directed Studies
In-depth investigation of selected problems in psychology by means of directed library research. Registration is restricted, permission to register being granted only by the graduate committee. A final report must be filed in the departmental office prior to submission of course grade.
PSYC 5901 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.591)
Independent Research
Permission to register and approval of research plan must be obtained from the graduate committee. A final research report must be filed in the departmental office prior to submission of course grade. The course may be repeated for credit.
PSYC 5903 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.593)
Practicum in Psychology
The practicum offers master's level students the opportunity to gain experience in a range of applied psychology settings with the goal of integrating academic and practical aspects of psychology. This course cannot be repeated for credit. Students will receive a grade of satisfactory or unsatisfactory. Details are available from the Department.
PSYC 5909 (formerly 49.599)
M.A. Thesis
PSYC 6101 [0.5 credit]
Social Psychology II
A seminar covering a selection of advanced topics in social psychology theory and research taken from recent publications and debates in the discipline.
PSYC 6102 [0.5 credit]
Organizational Psychology II
A seminar covering advanced topics in organizational psychology theory and research taken from recent publications and debates in the discipline.
PSYC 6105 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.615)
Psychological Aspects of Computer Use
An investigation of human factors related to the effective design of computer hardware and software. Topics may include the design and evaluation of information search procedures, graphic displays, and operation manuals on the assessment of usability. A research project will be required.
PSYC 6106 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.616)
Social Aspects of Computer Use
An investigation of the social psychological factors affecting the use of computers and the social consequences of their use Topics may include the use of computers in higher education and the social consequences of the Internet for the Third World.
PSYC 6200 [1.0 credit] (formerly 49.620 ) (BIOL 6303)
Advanced Seminar in Neuroscience
A seminar focusing on the active research areas and interests of faculty, guest lecturers and graduate students as well as current trends in diverse areas of neuroscience. (Also listed as PSY 6202 at the University of Ottawa)
Prerequisite: PSYC 5200.
PSYC 6204 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.624 ) (BIOL 6204)
Neuroscience Techniques I
Completion of a research project carried out under the supervision of a neuroscience faculty member, normally not the current supervisor. The student will learn a new neuroscience technique and apply it to a research objective. The course can be repeated for different projects. Students must obtain approval from the Director of the Neuroscience.
PSYC 6300 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.630 )
Special Topics in Neuroscience
An in depth study of current topics in neuroscience. Course content varies yearly and has recently included cognitive neuroscience, neuropharmacology, neurodegeneration, behavioural medicine and molecular neuroscience.
PSYC 6500 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.650)
Research Seminar in Developmental Psychology I
PSYC 6501 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.651)
Research Seminar in Developmental Psychology II
PSYC 6601 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.661)
Seminar in Human Neuropsychology I
A broad and intensive consideration of selected topics in human neuropsychology, integrating findings from psychology with related medical literature.
PSYC 6602 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.662)
Neuropsychological Assessment
Review of the rationale and practice of diagnosis and treatment based on neuropsychological test results. Reliability and validity of test batteries such as the Halstead-Reitan and the Luria-Nebraska are studied. Clinical analysis of patient protocols, including degenerative diseases, psychiatric disorders, seizures, head injury, brain tumors.
Prerequisite: PSYC 6601.
PSYC 6603 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.663)
Seminar in Human Neuropsychology II
A broad and intensive consideration of selected topics in human neuropsychology, integrating findings from psychology with related medical literature.
PSYC 6700 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.670)
Advanced Topics in Cognition II
An in-depth study of a specific topic in higher-level cognitive processes. Topics will vary from year to year and may include mathematical knowledge and processes, problem solving, or models of reading.
PSYC 6800 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.680)
Special Topics in Psychology
The topics of this course will vary from year to year, and will be announced in advance of the registration period.
PSYC 6900 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.690)
Directed Studies
Same description as PSYC 5900.
PSYC 6901 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.691)
Independent Research
Permission to register and approval of research plan must be obtained from the graduate committee. A final research report must be filed in the departmental office prior to submission of course grade. The course may be repeated for credit.
PSYC 6903, PSYC 6904 [0.5 credit] (formerly 49.693, 49.694)
Practicum in Psychology
The practicum offers Ph.D. students the opportunity to gain experience in a range of applied psychology settings with the goal of integrating academic and practical aspects of psychology. This course cannot be repeated for credit. Students will receive a grade of satisfactory or unsatisfactory. Details are available from the Department.
PSYC 6905 [1.0 credit] (formerly 49.695)
Comprehensive Examination
Available only to Ph.D. students. Students will receive a grade of Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory.
PSYC 6909 (formerly 49.699)
Ph.D. Thesis
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