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Graduate Calendar Archives: 2003 / 2004

Industrial Design

Mackenzie Building 3470
Telephone: (613) 520-5672
Fax: (613) 520-4465

The School

Director of the School: M. de Leeuw

The School of Industrial Design does not offer a program at the graduate level. However, it does offer graduate-level courses, which can be used towards a degree program in the School of Architecture and in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering in the Faculty of Engineering. Members of the School are available to supervise graduate research.

The interests and capabilities of the faculty members lie in the following areas:

User Studies

Applications of ergonomics and anthropometrics in industrial design; study of users from a market perspective.

Form Studies

Form development in industrial design; computer-aided design in industrial design.

Mass Production Studies

Advanced manufacturing methods in industrial design; quality and product life of manufactured goods.

Design Systems and Methods

Research and development in systems and methods as they apply to industrial design.

Contextual Studies

Cultural, social and ethical issues in industrial design.

Graduate Courses

Not all of the following courses are offered in a given year. For an up-to-date statement of course offerings for 2003-2004 and to determine the term of offering, consult the Registration Instructions and Class Schedule booklet, published in the summer and also available online at www.carleton.ca/cu/programs/sched_dates/

Course Designation System

Carleton's course designation system has been restructured. The first entry of each course description below is the new alphanumeric Carleton course code, followed by its credit value in brackets. The old Carleton course number (in parentheses) is included for reference, where applicable.

IDES 5000 [0.5 credit] (formerly 85.500)
Directed Studies in Industrial Design
Reading and research tutorials.

IDES 5301 [0.5 credit] (formerly 85.531)
Creative Problem Solving and Design
This course outlines problem-solving processes and how they can be applied in engineering design. The student will be introduced to and be expected to practice various systematic and creative problem-solving techniques. The emphasis is on the student's learning methodologies rather than accumulating information. The techniques may be successfully applied in any engineering specialty. (Also listed as MECH 5601.)
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