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Graduate Calendar Archives: 2003 / 2004

Canadian Studies

Dunton Tower 1206
Telephone: (613) 520-2366
Fax: (613) 520-3903
E-mail: canadian_studies@carleton.ca
Web site: www.carleton.ca/cdnstudies/

The School

Director: François Rocher

Associate Director: Julian Smith

Graduate Supervisor: To be announced

Coordinator, Heritage Conservation: Julian Smith

Coordinator, Canadian Women's Studies: Katherine Arnup

Coordinator, Aboriginal Studies and the North: To be announced

Coordinator, Cultural Studies: Stan McMullin

Undergraduate Supervisor: To be announced

New Sun Chair in Aboriginal Art and Culture: Allan J. Ryan

Adjunct Research Professors: Pat Armstrong, David C. Hawkes, Heather Menzies, James Page

Fellows: Richard T. Clippingdale, H. Blair Neatby

The School of Canadian Studies offers a program of study and research leading to the degrees of M.A. and Ph.D. in Canadian Studies.

The work of the School is conducted with the assistance of faculty and availability of coursework in a variety of supporting departments including: Architecture, Art History, Economics, English, Film Studies, French, Geography, History, Journalism and Communication, Law, Linguistics and Applied Language Studies, Mass Communications, Music, Political Economy, Political Science, Psychology, Public Policy and Administration, Religion, Social Work, Sociology and Anthropology, and Women's Studies.

The Canadian Studies program is interdisciplinary in emphasis. It enables students in the School to develop individual areas of concentration to meet particular interests in a broad range of Canadian issues. At the M.A. level, there are four program areas in Canadian Studies: Aboriginal Studies and the North, Women's Studies, Canadian Culture and Cultural Policy, and Heritage Conservation. The proximity of Carleton University to the National Library, the National Gallery of Canada, the national museums, the Library of Parliament, the National Archives of Canada, Statistics Canada, and the libraries of various government departments and embassies ensures excellent research facilities for graduate candidates in Canadian Studies. The School maintains close ties with the Department of Leisure Studies at Ottawa University, the Heritage Canada Foundation, and Parks Canada.

In 1982, with the aid of a grant from the Donner Foundation, the School initiated a program area of northern and Native studies, recently renamed Aboriginal Studies and the North. The same conditions and requirements apply as in other program areas; however, special consideration may be given to candidates for admission who have extensive knowledge of the north or of Aboriginal peoples, and the language requirement may be met by a demonstrated knowledge of an Aboriginal language in addition to English or French.

In 1983-84, a women's studies program area was instituted. Both interdisciplinary and comparative in focus, the program permits students to examine the interplay within the Canadian context between gender and race, gender and nationality, gender and class, and sex/gender as a dynamic principle in the process of imperialism, nation building, and the construction of national and ethnic identities.

Since 1986, the School has offered a program area in Canadian culture and cultural policy. Students with a broad interest in traditional and popular culture, music, art, film, literature, and performing arts will find the program's interdisciplinary approach to cultural theory and practice of great value.

A program area in heritage conservation began in 1989-90. With an interdisciplinary focus on the Canadian natural and built environment, the program permits the course of study to be tailored to individual interest and backgrounds. The School of Architecture, the Department of Leisure Studies at Ottawa University, the Heritage Canada Foundation, and Parks Canada cooperate in offering the program.

A joint Ph.D. degree program with Trent University was approved and introduced in 2000. This program builds on the combined strengths of the existing M.A. programs at the two universities, and provides Canada's only full interdisciplinary doctoral program in Canadian Studies. It has further enriched the graduate offerings by introducing five fields of study: Culture, Literature and the Arts; Environment and Heritage; Policy, Economy and Society, Identities; and Women's Studies.

Qualifying-Year Program

Applicants who do not qualify for direct admission to the master's program may, in exceptional cases, be admitted to a qualifying-year program. However, admission to the qualifying-year program does not imply automatic admission to the master's program. At the end of the qualifying-year program the student will be required to apply for entry into the master's program, at which time the School will determine the student's eligibility to enter the program.

Master of Arts

Admission Requirements

Applicants normally must hold an Honours B.A. (or the equivalent), with at least high honours standing, in one of the disciplines represented in the School. Applicants wishing to be considered for financial assistance from Carleton University are advised to submit completed applications to the School by February 1, since enrolment in the School is limited.

Language Requirement

The School requires a reading knowledge of French. This requirement may be satisfied in the following ways:

  • Successful completion of FINS 3105 or its equivalent (with a grade of B- or better).
  • Successful completion of a French language examination.
  • Alternatively, a student may fulfil this requirement with a demonstrated knowledge of an Aboriginal language.
  • The School conducts the French language examinations in September and January. Students choosing the first option should note that examination results in these courses form part of their record, although they are additional to the course requirements for the degree.

Program Requirements

The minimum requirements for the master's program are outlined in the General Regulations section of this Calendar.

The School of Canadian Studies specifies that all candidates must select one of the following program patterns:

3.0 credits, a thesis, and an oral examination

4.0 credits, and a research essay

5.0 credits, and a comprehensive examination in two parts: part one based on CDNS 5001 and part two based on one of CDNS 5101, CDNS 5201, CDNS 5301, CDNS 5302 or CDNS 5401.

Whichever pattern is selected, all students in the master's program are required to take CDNS 5001 and two of the following courses: CDNS 5101, CDNS 5102, CDNS 5201, CDNS 5202, CDNS 5301, CDNS 5302, CDNS 5401, CDNS 5402, CDNS 5501, CDNS 5601.

Comprehensive Examinations

A committee will be assigned to each candidate choosing the 5.0 credit course option to advise and assist in the preparation for the comprehensive examination. Normally, the comprehensive examination is written, but may, with the approval of the graduate supervisor, be oral. The comprehensive examination normally will be undertaken in the academic year in which the student completes CDNS 5001, but, with the approval of the graduate supervisor, may be undertaken at a later point in the student's program. Comprehensive examinations will be scheduled twice yearly: in September and in April.

Thesis/Research Essay Proposal

Students are required to file with the School a detailed proposal of their thesis or research essay project no later than the end of the second term of registration for students enrolled full-time, and no later than the end of the fifth term of registration for students enrolled part-time. Students failing to file a proposal may not be permitted to register in subsequent terms until this requirement has been met. Approval of proposals shall be the responsibility of the student's intended thesis/research essay supervisor, the graduate supervisor of the School, and one other faculty member.

Special Course Offerings in Heritage

Conservation Program Area

The School of Architecture offers two workshops in support of the Heritage Conservation Program Area. Students may take these courses as part of their M.A. requirements in Canadian Studies:
ARCC 5401
ARCU 5402

Proficiency in English

Proficiency in English is necessary to pursue graduate studies at Carleton University. All applicants whose first language is not English must satisfy this requirement by presenting a TOEFL score of 600 or better.

Ph.D. Program in Canadian Studies (joint program between Carleton University and Trent University)

Doctor of Philosophy

The doctoral program is offered jointly by the School of Canadian Studies at Carleton University and the Frost Centre for Canadian Studies and Native Studies at Trent University.

The Ph.D. program offers five fields of study: Culture, Literature, and the Arts; Environment and Heritage; Policy, Economy and Society; Identities; and Women's Studies. The program of courses and thesis guidance, drawing upon the faculty of the two academic units and universities, will encompass course requirements, comprehensive examinations, and a thesis.

The Ph.D. program in Canadian Studies normally will be undertaken on a full-time basis. In cases of exceptional merit, the School will accept a few candidates for the degree on a part-time basis.

Admission Requirements

The normal requirement for admission into the Ph.D. program is a master's degree (or equivalent), with at least high honours standing in Canadian Studies or one of the disciplines represented in the School. Applicants should note, however, that meeting the admission requirement does not guarantee admission to the program. Applicants wishing to be considered for financial assistance from Carleton University are advised to submit completed applications to the School by February 1, since enrolment in the School is limited.

Program Requirements

Doctoral candidates must successfully complete 10.0 credits. Candidates with deficiencies in certain areas may be admitted to the Ph.D. program, but normally will be required to complete additional work. The specific requirements are as follows:

  • 1.0 credit for successful completion of CDNS 6900, the mandatory core seminar;
  • 1.0 credit for successful completion of two courses or tutorials (or the equivalent) drawn from the graduate list offered by the School, below, with one 0.5-credit course drawn from each of the candidate's two major fields of study; a GPA of 9.0 or better must be obtained in these courses for students to be allowed to proceed to the comprehensive examinations;
  • 1.0 credit for successful completion of two 0.5-credit written comprehensive examinations. Students will be examined in two fields.
  • Satisfactory demonstration of an understanding of a language other than English. Although French is the preferred second language, students may be permitted to substitute an Aboriginal language indigenous to Canada or another language if it is demonstrably relevant to their research interests;
  • A public defence, in English, of a written thesis proposal. Following the completion of their comprehensives, students will be expected to defend a proposal of the research and analysis they plan to undertake in completing their Ph.D. thesis. The thesis proposal defence should normally occur within six months after completion of a student's comprehensive examinations. The thesis committee will be composed of three faculty members, always including one from each university;
  • A 7.0-credit thesis, which must be successfully defended in English at an oral examination.

Academic Standing

All Ph.D. candidates must obtain at least B+ standing or better (GPA 9.0) in each course counted towards the degree. Comprehensive examinations (which will be graded on a Satisfactory, Unsatisfactory or Pass with Distinction basis) are exempted from this required standing.

Comprehensive Examinations

All Ph.D. candidates must complete successfully a written comprehensive examination in each of their two major fields. The examination is in the form of two examination papers normally written one week apart. Comprehensive examinations normally are written and will be scheduled twice yearly: in September and in January. Normally, students will be expected to complete their comprehensives within 24 months of entering the program;

At the discretion of the School, candidates may be required to take an oral examination following the written examination.

The fields of study for the Ph.D. comprehensive examinations are to be chosen from the following list:

Culture, Literature, and the Arts
A general knowledge of theories of culture in general, Canadian theoretical discourses on cultural practices, and on the interplay among theory, art, and literature, and their social contexts.
Environment and Heritage
A general knowledge of locality, landscape, environment and region in Canada.
Policy, Economy and Society
A general knowledge of the complex web of relationships linking economy, civil society, and public policy in Canada and their interaction within social, political, and cultural life.
Identities
A general knowledge of the character and experience of individual, collective and communal identities in Canada.
Women's Studies
A general knowledge of women's experiences of the major dynamics of social, political, economic and cultural development at all levels of Canadian life.

Thesis Proposal

All students must defend publicly a thesis proposal after completing their comprehensive examinations. Full-time students must complete this requirement within the first two years of registration in the program.

Canadian Studies Courses at Carleton University by Fields of Study

Culture, Literature, and the Arts
CDNS 5301, CDNS 5302
Environment and Heritage
CDNS 5401, CDNS 5402
Policy, Economy and Society
CDNS 5302, CDNS 5501, CDNS 5601
Identities
CDNS 5101, CDNS 5102, CDNS 5501
Women's Studies
CDNS 5201, CDNS 5202, CDNS 5501

To meet program requirements Carleton students must take at least one of the 0.5 credit courses from the Canadian Studies courses listed above. Students can also choose from approved graduate courses at the Frost Centre for Canadian Studies and Native Studies at Trent University. Students should consult with the Graduate Studies Administrator for the complete listing of acceptable graduate courses available at Trent University in any given year.

Students may also register in graduate courses offered outside Canadian Studies. A list of courses with substantial Canadian content follows the Canadian Studies course list.

All graduate courses must be approved by the Ph.D. Coordinator in Canadian Studies at Carleton University.

Graduate Courses

Not all of the following courses are offered in a given year. For an up-to-date statement of course offerings for 2003-2004 and to determine the term of offering, consult the Registration Instructions and Class Schedule booklet, published in the summer and also available online at www.carleton.ca/cu/programs/sched_dates/

Course Designation System

Carleton's course designation system has been restructured. The first entry of each course description below is the new alphanumeric Carleton course code, followed by its credit value in brackets. The old Carleton course number (in parentheses) is included for reference, where applicable.

Students not registered in the M.A. program in the School of Canadian Studies may take interdisciplinary seminars, with permission of the School of Canadian Studies.

CDNS 5001 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.501)
Concepts of Canada
Interdisciplinary Seminar. Topic varies from year to year depending on instructor.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the School.
CDNS 5002 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.502)
Interdisciplinary Methods
A survey of the issues raised by problem-directed methodologies; critiques of existing methodology including from the standpoints of feminist and Aboriginal scholarship.
CDNS 5003 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.503)
Selected Topics in Canadian Studies
Topic varies from year to year.
CDNS 5101 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.511)
Aboriginal and Northern Issues I
Interdisciplinary seminar. An examination of the systemic shift Aboriginal Peoples and their northern territories have entered, where material production and good governance have to co-exist with the production of cultural symbols and social relations.
Precludes additional credit for CDNS 5100.
CDNS 5102 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.512)
Aboriginal and Northern Issues II
Interdisciplinary seminar. Developmental opportunities and constraints and the unique environments, experiences and living conditions which regulate Aboriginal Canada will be covered at micro and macro levels.
Precludes additional credit for CDNS 5100.
Prerequisite: CDNS 5101 or permission of the School of Canadian Studies.
CDNS 5201 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.521)
Canadian Women's Studies
Interdisciplinary seminar. An examination of the historical roots and contemporary dimensions of feminist theories and women's movements in Canada.
Precludes additional credit for CDNS 5200.
CDNS 5202 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.522)
Themes in Canadian Women's Studies
An interdisciplinary seminar focusing on one or more specific themes in Canadian women's studies. Topics may include women's paid and unpaid labour, sexuality and sexual practices, women's health and reproductive rights, and motherhood.
Precludes additional credit for CDNS 5200.
Prerequisite: CDNS 5201 or permission of the School of Canadian Studies.
CDNS 5301 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.531)
Canadian Cultural Studies
The arts, belief systems, institutions and communicative practices in Canada in relation to other social and historical structures.
Precludes additional credit for CDNS 5300.
CDNS 5302 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.532)
Canadian Cultural Policy
Evolution of Canadian cultural policy from its origins through to the contemporary search for cultural cohesion within a global context, with an emphasis on developments since the Massey Commission.
Precludes additional credit for CDNS 5300.
CDNS 5401 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.541)
Heritage Conservation: Theory
Evolution and current status of conservation theory in Canada, as it affects both cultural and natural resources. Particular attention is given to architectural and cultural landscapes as historical evidence of human interaction with our environment.
Precludes additional credit for CDNS 5400.
CDNS 5402 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.542)
Heritage Conservation: Practice
A consideration of various approaches to the conservation and mise-en-valeur of heritage resources, from scientific conservation to restoration to ritual reinterpretation and adaptive reuse. The seminar includes field exercises.
Precludes additional credit for CDNS 5400.
Prerequisite: CDNS 5401 or permission of the School of Canadian Studies.
CDNS 5501 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.551)
Collective Identities in Canadian Societies
An interdisciplinary examination of the relationships and conflicts among sex/gender, race, language, ethnicity and nation. Particular emphasis will be given to gendered understandings of racism, nationalism, regionalism, and multi-culturalism; and to conflicts between individuals and collective rights claims.
CDNS 5601 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.561)
Policy, Economy and Society in Canada
This interdisciplinary seminar will focus on relationships linking economy, civil society, and public policy in Canada and their interaction with social, political and cultural life. Themes include political economy, government moral regulation, community economic development and social change.
CDNS 5800 [1.0 credit] (formerly 12.580)
Internship/Practicum
Internships or practicum placements in an institutional setting outside of the University may fulfil up to 1.0 credit. Students are required to complete a formal written paper in addition to their internship/practicum activities. The written work is evaluated jointly by the student's internal and external advisers.
Prerequisite: completion of one full credit of coursework in Canadian Studies and prior approval of the School of Canadian Studies.
CDNS 5801 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.581)
Internship/Practicum
Internships or practicum placements in an institutional setting outside of the University may fulfil up to 1.0 credit. Students are required to complete a formal written paper in addition to their internship/practicum activities. The written work is evaluated jointly by the student's internal and external advisers.
Prerequisite: completion of one full credit of coursework in Canadian Studies and prior approval of the School of Canadian Studies.
CDNS 5802 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.582)
Internship/Practicum
Internships or practicum placements in an institutional setting outside of the University may fulfil up to 1.0 credit. Students are required to complete a formal written paper in addition to their internship/practicum activities. The written work is evaluated jointly by the student's internal and external advisers.
Prerequisite: completion of one full credit of coursework in Canadian Studies and prior approval of the School of Canadian Studies.
CDNS 5803 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.583)
Internship/Practicum
Internships or practicum placements in an institutional setting outside of the University may fulfil up to 1.0 credit. Students are required to complete a formal written paper in addition to their internship/practicum activities. The written work is evaluated jointly by the student's internal and external advisers.
Prerequisite: completion of one full credit of coursework in Canadian Studies and prior approval of the School of Canadian Studies.
CDNS 5900 [1.0 credit] (formerly 12.590)
Directed Studies
Reading and research tutorials supervised by a qualified adviser, in an area not covered by an existing seminar. Directed Studies are organized by individual students with a faculty member. Only 1.0 credit of directed studies tutorial can be used towards completion of the degree.
Prerequisite: prior approval of the School of Canadian Studies.
CDNS 5901 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.591)
Directed Studies
Reading and research tutorials supervised by a qualified adviser, in an area not covered by an existing seminar. Directed Studies are organized by individual students with a faculty member. Only 1.0 credit of directed studies tutorial can be used towards completion of the degree.
Prerequisite: prior approval of the School of Canadian Studies.
CDNS 5902 [1.0 credit] (formerly 12.592)
Directed Studies
Reading and research tutorials supervised by a qualified adviser, in an area not covered by an existing seminar. Directed Studies are organized by individual students with a faculty member. Only 1.0 credit of directed studies tutorial can be used towards completion of the degree.
Prerequisite: prior approval of the School of Canadian Studies.
CDNS 5903 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.593)
Directed Studies
Reading and research tutorials supervised by a qualified adviser, in an area not covered by an existing seminar. Directed Studies are organized by individual students with a faculty member. Only 1.0 credit of directed studies tutorial can be used towards completion of the degree.
Prerequisite: prior approval of the School of Canadian Studies.
CDNS 5908 [1.0 credit] (formerly 12.598)
Research Essay
CDNS 5909 [2.0 credits] (formerly 12.599)
M.A. Thesis
CDNS 6900 [1.0 credit] (formerly 12.690)
Ph.D. Core Seminar: Interdisciplinarity in Canadian Studies: Concepts, Theories & Methods
Available only to Ph.D. students in Canadian Studies. An examination of the complex theoretical and methodological issues associated with the discourse on an interdisciplinary study of Canada. Offered at Carleton and Trent through a combination of joint sessions at both universities and regular electronic communication.
CDNS 6901 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.691)
Ph.D. Tutorial
Available only to Ph.D. students in Canadian Studies. Reading and research tutorials. A program of research and written work in an area not covered by an existing graduate seminar.
CDNS 6902 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.692)
Ph.D. Tutorial
Available only to Ph.D. students in Canadian Studies. Reading and research tutorials. A program of research and written work in an area not covered by an existing graduate seminar.
CDNS 6905 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.695)
Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination
Available only to Ph.D. students in Canadian Studies. Students will receive a grade of Satisfactory, Unsatisfactory or Pass with Distinction.
CDNS 6907 [0.5 credit] (formerly 12.697)
Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination
Available only to Ph.D. students in Canadian Studies. Students will receive a grade of Satisfactory, Unsatisfactory or Pass with Distinction.
CDNS 6909 (formerly 12.699)
Ph.D. Thesis

Selection of Courses

In addition to the graduate courses offered by the School, the following courses are of particular relevance to students in Canadian Studies. The list is not exclusive and is subject to change. Students in the master's program in the School must complete at least 4.0 credits at the 5000-level, with the possibility of 1.0 credit at the 4000-level with prior approval from the School of Canadian Studies.

Students may take any 5000 or 6000-level courses in this list and count them toward their master's program. All other courses require prior approval from the Graduate Supervisor or Ph.D. Co-ordinator.

Note: Students should be aware that the number of spaces in graduate courses offered by other departments may be limited, and that registration may be conditional upon obtaining the prior approval of the department concerned. It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that permission is obtained from the appropriate department prior to registering in any of the department's courses.

Anthropology
ANTH 4700 Selected Problems in the Study of North American Native Peoples
ANTH 5106, ANTH 5107, ANTH 5308
Architecture
ARCH 4203 Society and Shelter
ARCH 5000, ARCH 5001, ARCH 5002,
ARCC 5401, ARCU 5402
Art History
ARTH 4000 Topics in Canadian Art: Art of the Land
ARTH 4005 Historic Dress Traditions of Canadian Indian Peoples
ARTH 4601 Topics in Twentieth-Century Art: Women Artists and Modernism in Europe and America
ARTH 4800 Readings in Twentieth-Century Architectural History
ARTH 4900 Directed Readings and Research
ARTH 4901 Directed Readings and Research
ARTH 4902 Directed Readings and Research
ARTH 5000, ARTH 5001, ARTH 5002, ARTH 5101
Comparative Literary Studies
CLST 5302, CLST 5508
Economics
ECON 4306 Employment Economics and Labour Policy
ECON 4800 Urban Economics
ECON 5301, ECON 5302, ECON 5303,ECON 5305, ECON 5401, ECON 5402, ECON 5801, ECON 5802
English Language and Literature
ENGL 4802 Canadian Ethnic Minority Lit.
ENGL 4803 English and French Canadian Lit.
ENGL 4806 Studies in Canadian Lit.
ENGL 4808 First Nations Literatures I
ENGL 4809 First Nations Literatures II
ENGL 5801, ENGL 5802, ENGL 5803, ENGL 5805, ENGL 5807, ENGL 5809
Film Studies
FILM 5208, FILM 5209
French
FREN 5500, FREN 5700
Geography
GEOG 4203 Urban Revitalization
GEOG 4207 Urban Development and Analysis
GEOG 4301 Advanced Cultural Geography
GEOG 4305 Historical Geography
GEOG 4407 Canadian Agriculture
GEOG 5401, GEOG 5403, GEOG 5405,
GEOG 5700, GEOG 5702, GEOG 5703
History
HIST 4302 Canada: Ideas & Culture
HIST 4304 Canada: Politics & Society
HIST 4306 Canada: Ethnicity & Community
HIST 4505 Sem. in Women's & Gender Hist.
HIST 5000, HIST 5310, HIST 5311, HIST 5312, HIST 5313, HIST 5506, HIST 5509, HIST 5700, HIST 5808
Journalism and Communication
JOUR 5000, JOUR 5305, JOUR 5401, JOUR 5500
Law
LAWS 4001 Law, Family and Gender
>LAWS 4002 Feminist Theories of Law
>LAWS 4107 Law in Advanced Capitalist Society
>LAWS 4309 Criminal Proceedings and Dissent: Political Offences and National Security Measures
>LAWS 4405 Labour Relations in the Public Service
LAWS 4501 Selected Problems in Comparative Constitutional Law
LAWS 4504 Aboriginal Peoples and the Canadian Criminal Legal System
LAWS 4507 Administrative Law and Control
LAWS 5002, LAWS 5007, LAWS 5008,
LAWS 5302, LAWS 5405, LAWS 5500,
LAWS 5503, LAWS 5900, LAWS 5901,
LAWS 5903, LAWS 5904
Mass Communication
MCOM 4100 Selected Topics in Mass Communication Analysis
MCOM 4102 Selected Topics in Mass Communication Analysis
MCOM 4500 Mass Media and Capitalist Democracy I
MCOM 4501 Mass Media and Capitalist Democracy II
MCOM 5201, MCOM 5203, MCOM 5205, MCOM 5301, MCOM 5505, MCOM 5506, MCOM 5507, MCOM 5508, MCOM 5509, MCOM 5605
Music
MUSI 5001, MUSI 5005, MUSI 5100, MUSI 5101, MUSI 5102, MUSI 5105
Political Science
PSCI 4000 Topics in Canadian Government and Politics
PSCI 4002 Policy Seminar: Problems of Northern Development
PSCI 4003 Politics and the Media
PSCI 4005 Stability, Justice and Federalism
PSCI 4006 Legislative Process in Canada
PSCI 4007 The Politics of Law Enforcement in Canada
PSCI 4008 National Security and Intelligence in the Modern State
PSCI 4009 Quebec Politics
PSCI 4100 Canadian and Comparative Local Government and Politics
PSCI 4101 French-English Relations
PSCI 4106 Labour and the Canadian State
PSCI 4107 Political Participation in Canada
PSCI 4108 Canadian Provincial Government and Politics
PSCI 4109 The Politics of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
PSCI 4204 Elections
PSCI 4206 Indigenous Politics of North America
PSCI 4401 Business-Government Relations in Canada
PSCI 5003, PSCI 5000, PSCI 5006, PSCI 5007, PSCI 5008, PSCI 5009, PSCI 5100, PSCI 5101, PSCI 5200, PSCI 5201, PSCI 5306, PSCI 5307, PSCI 5401, PSCI 5507, PSCI 5601, PSCI 6000, PSCI 6001
Public Administration
PADM 5000, PADM 5004, PADM 5006, PADM 5008, PADM 5009, PADM 5106, PADM 5109, PADM 5205, PADM 5306, PADM 5308, PADM 5600, PADM 5604, PADM 5607, PADM 5701, PADM 5704, PADM 5804, PADM 5806, PADM 5809
Social Work
SOWK 4102 Aboriginal Peoples and Social Policy
SOWK 4103 Practice and Policy in Immigration
SOWK 4203 Social Work Practice from an Aboriginal Perspective
SOWK 4204 Social Work and Aging
SOWK 5100, SOWK 5101, SOWK 5102, SOWK 5105, SOWK 5106, SOWK 5108, SOWK 5207, SOWK 5301, SOWK 5302, SOWK 5704
Sociology
SOCI 4501 Workshop in Demography/Human Ecology
SOCI 4502 Workshop on Work and Organizations
SOCI 5205, SOCI 5302, SOCI 5308,
SOCI 5400, SOCI 5405, SOCI 5608
Women's Studies
WOMN 5000, WOMN 5001
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