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Graduate Calendar Archives: 2004 / 2005

Political Science

Loeb Building B640
Telephone: (613) 520-2777
Fax: (613) 520-4064
E-mail: political_science@carleton.ca
Web site: www.carleton.ca/polisci

The Department

Chair of the Department: Chris Brown
Associate Chair: J. Malloy
Departmental Supervisor of Graduate Studies: W.R. Newell
Assistant Supervisor of Graduate Studies: M. Sucharov

The Department offers programs leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. Graduate study and research may be undertaken in the fields of political theory, Canadian government and politics, comparative government and politics, international relations, and public administration and policy analysis. Within these fields, students may select more specialized areas, such as classical, medieval, and modern, or analytic and empirical theory; comparative government and politics of a particular area or group of countries where the Department has developed particular strength.

In the Department and the self-standing schools and institutes, Carleton University houses one of the three largest concentrations in Canada of well-known political science professionals. In this configuration, the Department is unique in offering the full range of fields that make up modern political science, and is thus well placed to develop critical and analytical skills in its degree candidates, as the range of perspectives, priorities, and methodologies in contemporary political theory and political studies in general are brought into close relation with one another.

The Department is committed to the view that the goal of studying politics is to continue and further the search for the meaning and the morality of public life (community) by historical, critical, empirical, and analytical means. A community's politics and its public policy describe the extent of political community that is aspired to, and which can feasibly be accomplished given the context of power relat ions in the international and domestic institutional and economic conjunctures. The Department exists to continue the discussions that run through the history of the study of politics about what is good, and how to maintain the autonomy of the sphere of the public and the political in the face of multiple challenges, which now include citizen apathy and economic forces that escape states. Students emerge with minds trained to identify, weigh, and sift ideals and evidence, using the full range of methodologies, and with grounding in the politics of areas and institutional configurations. They are also equipped for one of the most important roles in human life: that of citizen.

Qualifying-Year Program

Applicants with a general (3-year) B.A. in Political Science, with second-class standing, may be considered for admission to a qualifying-year program. Candidates who complete the qualifying year with high honours standing may be considered for admission to the master's program the following year.

Refer to the General Regulations section of this Calendar for details of the regulations governing the qualifying year.

Master of Arts

Admission Requirements

The normal requirement for admission to the master's program is B.A.(Honours) (or the equivalent) in Political Science, with at least high honours standing.

Honours graduates in fields other than political science will be considered on the basis of their academic background and standing, and will be judged on a case-by-case basis. Those with only minor deficiencies may be required to take certain specified courses, while others whose degrees are less closely related to political science may be required to register in the qualifying year, at the discretion of the Department. Graduates of three-year programs in political science will be required either to complete the fourth year of an honours degree and reapply, or register in the qualifying year of the M.A. (see above), de pending on work completed to date and academic standing.

Program Requirements

All master's candidates will fulfil a 5.0 credit program requiring departmental approval. No more than 1.0 credit may be taken at the 4000-level. It is anticipated that candidates will enter with both political theory and research methods in their backgrounds. In cases where this is not so, candidates will, with the advice of the Department, select suitable courses as part of their programs.

All candidates, in consultation with the Department, will pursue their degree either by course work only or by undertaking an independent research project. The independent research project can be fulfilled in one of two ways: a 1.0 credit research paper on a topic related to at least one of the courses taken, that may represent a significant development of one or more papers submitted in fulfillment of course requirements; or a 2.0-credit thesis.

Details of defences for the above M.A. options are outlined in the section on defences.

Students who choose to specialize in Canadian government and politics must demonstrate a reading knowledge of French, except where a degree of proficiency in another language makes more sense in relation to the student's program of studies.

Students whose mother tongue is other than English and who do not intend to specialize in Canadian politics, or students whose research interests require another language or another research skill such as methods, may obtain permission from the Department to substitute another language or a research skill for French. Departmental language tests are administered twice a year.

The language requirement may also be satisfied by passing an approved language course with a grade of B- or better.

Course Requirements

All master's candidates are required to take an approved methods course. Students who have not already taken a course in research design and methods at the undergraduate level m ay be required, depending on the course pattern chosen, to take PSCI 5700. When appropriate and related significantly to the program of study, another methods course, such as PSCI 5304, PSCI 5701, PSCI 5702, or PSCI 5703, may be substituted.

Candidates will follow one of three program patterns:

  • 5.0 credits in approved courses
  • Research Essay (1.0 credit) and 4.0 credits in courses
  • Thesis (2.0 credits) and 3.0 credits in courses

Study Themes

The Department offers a number of study themes that draw systematically from the department's range of courses and expertise. Students are encouraged, but not required, to pursue one of these study themes.

Seven study themes are currently available. These are:

  • Public Affairs and Policy Analysis
  • Political Theory: Modernity, Technology and the Common Good
  • North American Government and Community Studies
  • European Politics
  • Development Politics
  • Global Politics and Society
  • Canadian Politics, Government and Institutions

Students pursuing a study theme are required to meet the general program requirements for the M.A. degree. That is, they must complete a 5.0 credit program, including an approved methods course if they have not already taken a course in research design and methodology at the undergraduate level. Students pursuing a study theme may choose either the research essay or thesis program pattern. The research essay or thesis they write must be on an approved topic appropriate to their study theme. As part of their program, students pursuing a study theme must take a minimum of 1.5 credits of designated thematic courses, as listed below. Students may substitute other courses for those listed only with the approval of the Supervisor of Graduate Studies.

Public Affairs and Policy Analysis
This theme of study focuses on theoretical and practical analysis of the policy process, including the design, management, communication, and analysis of all aspects of policy, with particular emphasis on quantitative analysis of public opinion, media impacts on policy, and policy outcomes.

The study theme will include:

  • PSCI 6407, PSCI 6408, plus either PSCI 5902 or one of: PSCI 5006, PSCI 5109, PSCI 5406, PSCI 5509;
  • Research Essay or thesis on a topic appropriate to the theme.


Political Theory: Modernity, Technology, and the Common Good
This theme explores ethical and analytical concepts for the evaluation of contemporary political practice, including legitimacy, civic virtue, and human rights. Its central topics include the critique of modernity; global technology; the communitarian-liberalism debate; alternative understandings of the common good; and the competing claims of charity and justice. Its approaches include hermeneutics, phenomenology, postmodernism, critical theory, democratic theory, and political culture and myth.

The study theme will include:

  • PSCI 4305 or PSCI 6300 and PSCI 6301; plus one of PSCI 5301, PSCI 5302, PSCI 5304, PSCI 5308, PSCI 5309;
  • Research Essay or thesis on a topic appropriate to the theme.

North American Government and Community Studies
This theme focuses on the politics of the North American region. Students can explore the forces linking Canada, the United States and Mexico from a variety of perspectives, including institutions, civil society and political economy, as well as the domestic and international politics of the three countries.

The study theme will include:

  • PSCI 5100 or PSCI 5607; one of: PSCI 5000, PSCI 5003, PSCI 5006, PSCI 5007, PSCI 5008, PSCI 5009, PSCI 5101, PSCI 5401, and one of PSCI 5205, PSCI 5206, PSCI 5306, PSCI 5307;
  • Research Essay or thesis on a topic appropriate to the theme.

European Politics
The theme focuses on the contemporary transitions of European politics, encompassing political integration through the European Union and the transition from communism in Eastern Europe, Central Europe, and Russia.

These changes have called into question conventional thinking about market reform, democratization, and the role of the state. Because these shifts and transformations have created an environment in which European political issues have become both more continental in scope and more comparable, students opting for this scheme can pursue a course of study encompassing both Western and Eastern Europe.

The study theme will include:

  • At least 1.5 credits, including at least one of PSCI 5104, PSCI 5105, PSCI 5106; and at least one of: PSCI 5503, PSCI 5504, PSCI 5608, PSCI 5609;
  • Research essay or thesis appropriate to the theme.

Development Politics
This theme features topical, critical, and analytical approaches to development. Students will explore the political economy of development and underdevelopment, demo cratization and the elaboration of "civil society", the politics of aid giving and receiving, and the role of non-governmental organizations.

The study theme will include:

  • PSCI 5202; plus two of: PSCI 5107, PSCI 5108, PSCI 5203, PSCI 5405, PSCI 5808;
  • Research Essay or thesis on a topic appropriate to the theme.

Global Politics and Society
This theme focuses on the politics of global society. Students will explore the ways in which the process of globalization, conceived as the compression of the world and the intensification of consciousness of the world as a whole, accelerated by the political and economic collapse of the communist bloc and the integration of its successor states into the world economy, has altered the international economic and political orders.

The study theme will include:

  • PSCI 5509 and 5808; plus one of: PSCI 5801, PSCI 5804, PSCI 5805, PSCI 5807;
  • Research Essay or thesis on a topic appropriate to the theme.

Canadian Politics, Government and Institutions
This theme takes up recent debates in Canada about the relationship between civil society and government, political culture and political economy, political parties and state institutions. The effectiveness of various kinds of regimes and institutional and state structures, the role that such structures play in promoting or resisting change, and the changes in the reach and autonomy of politics and the state itself can be explored within this theme.

The study theme will include:

  • At least 3.0 credits of: PSCI 5000, PSCI 5003, PSCI 5006, PSCI 5007, PSCI 5008, PSCI 5009, PSCI 5101, PSCI 5401, PSCI 5507, PSCI 5601, PSCI 6000, PSCI 6001;
  • Research essay or thesis appropriate to the theme.

Defences

In the case of the student choosing a research essay, that essay will be evaluated by two of the Department's faculty members including the supervisor and a second reader, and a letter grade will b e assigned. An oral defence of the essay is not required but may be requested by the supervisor or second reader.

In the case of the student choosing a thesis, the thesis will be evaluated by three people: the student's thesis supervisor from the Department, a second reader from the Department, and an external third reader who is generally from another Carleton Department but may sometimes come from outside the University. A thesis must be defended orally before the three evaluators. No letter grade is assigned, but notations of Pass with Distinction, Satisfactory, and Unsatisfactory are assigned.

Academic Standing

All master's candidates must obtain a B standing or better (GPA 8.0). One grade of C+ may be allowed.

Internship Program

Internship placements may be available to persons eligible to work in Canada who are full-time students and are registered in the Internship Program option of the master's program. The Internship Program is an option within the five-course, research essay, or thesis M.A. program patterns. Placements locate students for one term in government departments or non-governmental organizations and integrate the theoretical and practical aspects of Graduate Studies in Political Science. A placement is combined with registration in PSCI 5902, Internship Placement. This course is required for students who graduate from this option.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Ph.D. program in political science normally will be undertaken on a full-time basis. However, in cases of exceptional merit, the Department will accept a few candidates for the degree on a part-time basis.

Admission Requirements

The normal requirement for admission to the Ph.D. program is a master's degree (or its equivalent) in political science with high honours standing or better. Applicants should note, however, that meeting the admission requirement does not guarantee admission to the program. Review of the department's competitive selec tion process indicates that students with a GPA below 10.0 (A-) in the master's program are generally not recommended for admission to the doctoral program. Students applying on the basis of a master's degree from other disciplines will be considered on a case-by-case basis, and may be required to take additional courses as part of the program.

Program Requirements

Details on all program requirements are provided in the departmental Guidelines for Ph.D. Candidates.

The normal program requirements for Ph.D. candidates are outlined in the General Regulations section of this Calendar.

It is anticipated that Ph.D. candidates will enter with a background in political theory at the undergraduate level, regardless of their desired field of specialization. Those who do not will be treated as special cases and will have their programs arranged accordingly. If statistical proficiency is needed for the preparation of the thesis, students will also be expected to take a course in research methods. Candidates are also expected to demonstrate proficiency in a second language or in research methods. All candidates will complete PSCI 6906.

The program requirements (10.0 credits unless additional course work is required) for Ph.D. candidates in Political Science are the following:

  • At least 1.0 credit at the graduate level in each of the candidate's two major fields of study; a GPA of 9.0 or better must be obtained in these courses for students to be allowed to proceed to the comprehensive examinations.
  • Satisfactory completion of PSCI 6900 (0.5 credit), Ph.D. Field Examination I and PSCI 6905 (0.5 credit), Ph.D. Field Examination II. Field examinations are normally written on two occasions each year, in April and August.
  • Proficiency in a research skill, as outlined under research skill requirement
  • At least 1.0 credit will normally be taken during the second year of the program in fields allied to the major topic s of the thesis. This credit will normally be fulfilled through regular course work rather than tutorials.
  • Successful completion of PSCI 6906 (1.0 credit)
  • A public defence, in English, of a written thesis proposal
  • A 5.0 credit thesis, written in English or French, which will be defended in English at an oral examination.

Full-time students are required to complete the comprehensive examinations within 12 months of entering the program, and must normally complete the public defence of the thesis proposal, preceded by its formal acceptance by the supervisory committee, within 24 months of entering the doctoral program.

Ph.D. candidates will each be assigned a faculty member to advise them on their studies. Students' programs, including the choice of supervisor and the thesis committee, must be approved by the Department. The thesis supervisor will normally be chosen from among faculty members in the Department of Political Science. Upon approval of the thesis supervisor and the Department, committee members may be chosen from elsewhere within the University.

Research Skill Requirement

Ph.D. candidates must demonstrate the ability to use a research skill appropriate to their program. The research skill requirement will normally be satisfied before the defence of the thesis proposal, and will take one of the following forms:

  • An ability to read and translate French or another language appropriate to their course of study; or the ability to speak a language other than English sufficient to conduct interviews in that language
  • Credit work in an approved political science methods course, workshop, or colloquium, equivalent to 1.0 credit; or any two of the following courses (or an approved alternative): PSCI 5700, PSCI 5701, PSCI 5702, and PSCI 5703.

Comprehensive Examinations

All Ph.D. candidates must successfully complete a written comprehensive examination in each of their two major fields. Field examinations normally take place twice yearly, in April and August. At the discretion of the Department, candidates may be required to take an oral examination following the written examination.

The fields of study for the Ph.D. comprehensive examination are to be chosen from the following list:

Political Theory
  • Democracy in the Age of Global Technology
  • Politics, Statecraft and the Common Good
  • Tradition, Interpretation and Civic Hermeneutics
  • Ideology, Power and Political Morality
  • Politics and Statecraft in Non-Western Traditions
  • Religion, Civil Association and Individualism
  • Collective Identities: Gender, Race and Nation

Public Affairs and Policy Analysis

  • Canadian and Comparative Public Sector Reform
  • Public Policy, Public Opinion and Public Belief Systems
  • Methods for Quantitative Analysis and Evaluation
  • Gender and Race in Public Policy and Administration
  • Socio-Technical Change and Policy Design
  • Political Communication, Political Persuasion and Social Marketing
  • Domestic Security Policy and Management

Canadian Government and Politics

  • Federalism and the Constitution
  • Political Institutions and Processes
  • Political Culture and Socialization
  • Political Economy
  • Provincial, Territorial and Local Government and Politics
  • Administration and Public Policy Analysis
  • Foreign Policy and Relations
  • Canadian Political Thought and Ideology
  • Gender and the State
  • The Politics of Identity, Difference and Movements for Change
  • Communications and Media

International Relations

  • Foreign Policy Analysis
  • Gender and International Relations
  • Global Governance and International Organization
  • Global Political Economy
  • International Development
  • International Political Sociology
  • Conflict and Conflict Resolution

Comparative Government and Politics

a) Countries and Areas

  • Europe and the European Union
  • Russia and Soviet Successor States
  • North America
  • Latin America
  • Africa
  • Asia
  • Middle East

b) Topics or Themes

  • State and Civil Society
  • Political Governance and Institutions
  • Development
  • Social Movements
  • Nationalism, Citizenship, Race and Ethnicity
  • Political Behavior
  • Gender and Politics
  • Political Economy

Thesis Proposal

All students must publicly defend a thesis proposal after completing their comprehensive examinations. Full-time students must complete this requirement within the first two years of registration in the program.

Selection of Courses

Within the scope of the regulations, the following undergraduate courses (fully described in the Undergraduate Calendar) may be taken by graduate students.

Please note that not all of these courses are offered every year. Students should consult the timetable published each year in early June.

Political Science
PSCI 4000 Topics in Canadian Government and Politics
PSCI 4002 Policy Seminar: Problems of Northern Development
PSCI 4003 Politics and the Media
PSCI 4005 Stability, Justice and Federalism
PSCI 4007 The Politics of Law Enforcement in Canada
PSCI 4008 National Security and Intelligence in the Modern State
PSCI 4009 Quebec Politics
PSCI 4100 Canadian and Comparative Local Government and Politics
PSCI 4101 French-English Relations
PSCI 4102 Politics of Western Liberal Democracies
PSCI 4103 The Modern State
PSCI 4104 Theory and Practice in Third World Development
PSCI 4105 Selected Problems in Third World Development
PSCI 4107 Political Participation in Canada
PSCI 4108 Canadian Provincial Government and Politics
PSCI 4109 The Poli tics of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
PSCI 4200 Policy Making in the United States
PSCI 4201 Politics of Influence in the United States
PSCI 4202 Comparative Constitutional Politics
PSCI 4205 Identity Politics
PSCI 4208 Queer Politics
PSCI 4304 Political Inquiry
PSCI 4305 Contemporary Political Theory
PSCI 4400 Socio-Technical Change and Public Policy Design
PSCI 4401 Business-Government Relations in Canada
PSCI 4402 Gender, State, and Public Policy
PSCI 4407 Public Policy: Content and Creation
PSCI 4408 Public Affairs Management and Analysis
PSCI 4409 Issues in Development Management
PSCI 4500 Gender and Globalization
PSCI 4501 Gender and P olitics in Post-Communist Societies
PSCI 4505 Transitions to Democracy
PSCI 4600 Analysis of International Politics
PSCI 4601 Foreign Policies of Soviet Successor States
PSCI 4602 Bargaining and Negotiation
PSCI 4603 Analysis of International Political Economy
PSCI 4604 Selected Problems in International Political Economy
PSCI 4605 Gender in International Relations
PSCI 4606 American Foreign Policy
PSCI 4802 International Politics of Africa
PSCI 4803 Foreign Policies of Major East Asian Powers

Students are encouraged to look for courses within Carleton in the Departments of Economics, Geography, History, Law, Philosophy, and Sociology and Anthropology; the Schools of Business, Journalism and Communication, Public Administration, and the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs; and in the Institutes of European and Russian Studies, and Political Economy. They are equally strongly encouraged to look for courses in the Departments of Political Science and Philosophy at the University of Ottawa.

All courses selected will be subject to the approval of the Depar tment, on grounds of appropriateness to the program of study and the avoidance of excessive overlap between courses.

Graduate Courses

Not all of the following courses are offered in a given year. For an up-to-date statement of course offerings for 2004-2005 and to determine the term of offering, consult the Registration Instructions and Class Schedule booklet, published in the summer and also available online at www.carleton.ca/cu/programs/sched_dates/

Course Designation System

Carleton's course designation system has been restructured. The first entry of each course description below is the new alphanumeric Carleton course code, followed by its credit value in brackets. The old Carleton course number (in parentheses) is included for reference, where applicable.

Enrolment in graduate courses requires the permission of the Department, through the supervisor of graduate studies.

PSCI 5000 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.500)
Topics in Canadian Government and Politics
Depending on student demand and faculty interest, a seminar will be offered on the political challenges faced by citizens, politicians and governments in Canada.
PSCI 5002 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.502)
Political Law: Principles
An examination of the legal framework of the state, and the various types of instruments of government. It treats the way law makes its impact upon decision-making, with a particular focus on the influence of law on policy, administrative action, and political life.
PSCI 5003 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.503)
Political Parties in Canada
A seminar on political parties and party systems in Canadian federal politics, including an examination of patterns of historical development, party organization and finance, relationships with social movements, and the impact of Canadian federalism.
PSCI 5006 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.506)
Legislative Process in Canada
The role of Parliament and of the individual M.P. in terms of policy making, representation and the passage of legislation. Also offered at the undergraduate level, with different requirements, as PSCI 4006, for which additional credit is precluded.
PSCI 5007 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.507)
Topics in Canadian Politics and Government in Comparative Perspective
Depending on student demand and faculty interest, a semi nar will be offered on topics in Canadian politics and government within a comparative perspective, the various countries being considered chosen on the basis of the issue at hand.
PSCI 5008 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.508)
The Politics of Energy and the Environment
A research seminar focusing upon the substantive issues, the policy structures and processes, and current Canadian governmental response in the area of energy policy and environmental quality management.
PSCI 5009 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.509)
Canadian Political Economy
A seminar on political economy as a traditional and contemporary approach to the study of Canadian politics and the Canadian state. Canada's economic development, social relations (including gender and race relations), and position in the international political economy is explored.
PSCI 5100 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.510)
Indigenous Politics of North America
Issues of governance regarding the original peoples of Canada, Mexico and the United States before and since the European invasion, including: movement for restoration of cultural, socio-economic, political, land and self-government rights. Also offered at the undergraduate level, with different requirements, as PSCI 4206, for which additional credit is precluded.
PSCI 5101 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.511)
Canadian Federalism
A study of the evolution and contemporary operation of the Canadian federal system, noting particularly the specific social, political, economic, and structural features which underlie its operational performance, its resilience in crisis, and its potential for adaptation.
PSCI 5104 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.514)
The Transition from Communism
An in-depth investigation of the problems of transition in post-communist societies.
PSCI 5105 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.515)
Post-Communist Poli tics in East Central Europe
A comparative examination of the emergence of post-communist political systems in East Central Europe.
PSCI 5106 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.516)
Selected Problems in the Politics of Soviet Successor States
A seminar on selected problems of nation-building in Russia, Ukraine, and other Soviet successor states.
PSCI 5107 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.517)
Globalization, Adjustment and Democracy in Africa
The nature of global pressures in Africa as states go through a "second wind" of political and economic change. Also offered at the undergraduate level, with different requirements, as PSCI 4207, for which additional credit is precluded.
PSCI 5108 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.518)
State, Revolution and Reform
The dynamics of political change and economic growth in non-Western states, emphasizing challenges to dominant patterns of policy-making with a view of exploring alternate modes of modernity.
PSCI 5109 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.519)
Comparative Public Policy
A review of approaches to the study of policy, of the impact of political factors on policy, and of the substance of policy choices in such domestic fields as communications, social security, health, industrial and rural development policies in selected countries.
PSCI 5200 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.520)
Nationalism
A seminar on the historical and comparative study of nationalism, with emphasis on its role in the promotion of political change.
PSCI 5201 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.521)
Politics in Plural Societies
A seminar on politics in multicultural societies and multi-national states, including settler and post-colonial societies. Topics may include: conflict relating to race, religion, language, regionalism, intra-state nationalism, multicultural policies and theories of plura lism.
PSCI 5202 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.522)
Politics of Third World Development
A seminar examining the politics of development and underdevelopment in the Third World. Topics covered include theory, selected issues, and case studies from Africa, Asia, and Latin America.
PSCI 5203 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.523)
Southern Africa in the Post-Apartheid Era
An exploration of he pathology of apartheid, the reasons for its end, and prospects for democratization and development in southern Africa in the era of globalization. Also offered at the undergraduate level, with different requirements, as PSCI 4203, for which additional credit is precluded.
PSCI 5204 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.524)
Elections
The conduct and meaning of elections in contemporary states. Attention to the connection of elections to concepts of representation, policy mandates, and political parties, and to electoral systems and referenda. Also offered at the undergraduate level, with different requirements, as PSCI 4204, for which additional credit is precluded.
PSCI 5205 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.525)
Problems in American Government I
A research seminar on topics such as the distribution of power, decision-making processes, the impact of technology, strains in intergovernmental relations, civil-military relations, governmental news management and secrecy; executive accountability, and impediments to reform of Congress and the presidency.
PSCI 5206 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.526)
Problems in American Government II
A research seminar on topics such as political violence and social change, the roles of mass media, business Úlite roles, political corruption, civil rights and minority politics, and the urban crisis.
PSCI 5301 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.531)
Modern Political Culture and Ideology
Connections among image , symbol, myth, language, and politics. Topics include the expressive and designative conceptions of language; myth, metaphor and the foundations of civic life; rhetoric and the sensus communis; romanticism and nationalism; myth in democratic and totalitarian politics; and the structure of political culture.
PSCI 5302 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.532)
Democratic Theories
Analysis of various theories of democracy and community, from classical to modern.
PSCI 5303 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.533)
Governmentality and Politics
Utilizing the work of Foucault and others on 'governmentality', this course will analyze national and international government not only as a set of institutions or processes, but also in terms of specific arts and strategies. Topics may include federalism, colonialism, liberalism, but also arts of resistance. Also offered at the undergraduate level, with different requirements, as PSCI 4303, for which additional credit is precluded.
PSCI 5304 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.534)
Political Inquiry
This seminar focuses on the major approaches to research in political areas as discussed in contemporary philosophy of the social sciences, exploring the variety of explanatory strategies in use in the contemporary study of politics.
Precludes additional credit for PSCI 5700.
PSCI 5305 [0.5 credit]
Contemporary Political Thought in the Middle East
The paradigmatic trends that have emerged as a result of the encounter of the region with modernity. Secular and religious responses and reactions to the Enlightenment. Also offered at the undergraduate level, with different requirements, as PSCI 4302, for which additional credit is precluded.
PSCI 5306 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.536)
North American Political Traditions
A seminar on the interpretations that may include American, Mexican, anglo-Canadian and franco-Canadi an political traditions.
Precludes additional credit for PSCI 5305.
PSCI 5307 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.537)
Political Thought in North America
Depending on student demand and faculty interest, a tutorial will be offered in topics related to the development of contemporary political thinking, including some more descriptive and contemporary topics such as the impact of religion and religiosity in political thought and culture.
Precludes additional credit for PSCI 5305.
PSCI 5308 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.538)
Concepts of Political Community I
A critical survey of concepts of political community, including the common good, justice, citizenship, statesmanship, democracy, and legitimacy, from ancient, modern, and contemporary political theory.
Precludes additional credit for PSCI 4306.
PSCI 5309 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.539)
Concepts of Political Community II
A continued critical survey of concepts of political community, including the common good, justice, citizenship, statesmanship, democracy, and legitimacy, from ancient, modern, and contemporary political theory. Precludes additional credit for PSCI 4307.
Prerequisite: PSCI 5308 or permission of the Department.
PSCI 5401 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.541)
Canadian Public Administration and Policy Analysis
The theory and practice of public administration in Canada, with emphasis on the federal level, including the role of the bureaucracy in policy making.
PSCI 5402 [0.5 credit]
Politics of Diversity in Public Affairs
An examination of the implications of diversity in public affairs including gender, race, sexual orientation and disability. Their impact on public policy creation and its implementation in public administration.
PSCI 5404 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.544)
Public Administration in Developed Western Count ries
A seminar in comparative public administration, with emphasis on Commonwealth countries, the United States, France, and Germany.
PSCI 5405 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.545)
Public Administration in Developing Countries
A seminar on the literature and characteristics of development administration; comparison by region, country, and topic.
PSCI 5406 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.546)
Topics in Public Affairs
A seminar on selected topics in the role and impact of media, issues in public affairs and public policy.
PSCI 5409 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.549)
Research Seminar in Public Administration
The content of this seminar will vary from year to year according to faculty research interests and student demand.
PSCI 5501 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.551)
Selected Issues in Political Economy I
A research seminar exploring a selected topic of current research having a political economy perspective, such as power and stratification; dynamics of state action; contrasting views on administration as an instrument of political economy; culture, ideology, and social relations; and the labour process. (Also listed as PECO 5501 and SOCI 5404.)
PSCI 5502 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.552)
Selected Issues in Political Economy II
A research seminar exploring a selected topic of current research having a political economy perspective, such as power and stratification; dynamics of state action; contrasting views on administration as an instrument of political economy; culture, ideology, and social relations; and the labour process. (Also listed as PECO 5502 and SOCI 5505.)
PSCI 5503 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.553)
Topics in West European Politics
Domestic politics in Britain, France, Germany, Italy, and selected minor European powers.
Precludes additional credit for PSCI 5500.
PSCI 5504 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.554)
Topics in West European Politics
This course is designed to deal intensively with comparative and supra-national issues concerning the European Community, NATO, and other Western European institutions.
Precludes additional credit for PSCI 5500.
PSCI 5505 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.555)
Topics in Comparative Politics I
A research seminar dealing with a central theme of current research in comparative politics, such as: the effects of state policy and expenditure; technology and politics; political psychology; sex/gender and politics; the military and politics; Marxism and politics; religion and politics; studies in revolution; comparative parties and interest groups.
PSCI 5506 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.556)
Sex/Gender and Politics
Examines selected sex/gender dimensions of politics in comparative perspective. Topics may include: gendered nature of authority, sex/gender regimes and state forms; feminist accounts of citizenship, representation, power and democracy; women's movements and anti-feminist movements; identity politics; gendered accounts of nationalism and multiculturalism.
PSCI 5507 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.557)
Social Movements and Civil Society in Comparative Perspective I
This course examines major theoretical approaches to social movements with a focus on the civil societies of industrialized countries in a globalizing context. Specific movements to be examined may include the women's movement, the environmental movement, and the anti-globalization movement.
PSCI 5508 [0.5 credit]
Social Movements and Civil Society in Comparative Perspective II
This course examines major theoretical approaches to social movements with a focus on the civil societies of developing countries in a globalizing context. Specific movements to be examined may include the women's mov ement, the environmental movement, and the anti-globalization movement.
PSCI 5509 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.559)
Governing in the Global Economy
The course examines how national states respond to challenges of governing in an increasingly interdependent global economy. The course will be comparative in its focus, emphasizing advanced industrial societies primarily in western Europe and Canada.
PSCI 5601 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.561)
Analysis of Canadian Foreign Policy
A research seminar on contemporary Canadian external policies, with emphasis on the analysis of cases and issues, and comparisons with other national actors.
PSCI 5607 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.567)
International Politics of North America
An examination of continentalism in Canadian foreign policy during the twentieth century that charts regional, economic, political, and defence relations in North America. Also offered at the undergraduate level, with different requirements, as Political Science PSCI 4607, for which additional credit is precluded.
PSCI 5608 [0.5 credit]
European Integration and European Security
A seminar focusing on issues related to the formation of supra-national decision-making structures in Europe. Also offered at the undergraduate level, with different requirements, as Political Science PSCI 4608, for which additional credit is precluded. (Also listed as EURR 4104/5104).
PSCI 5609 [0.5 credit]
Selected topics in European Integration Studies
A seminar focusing on selected topics related to European integration in the post-World War II period. (Also listed as EURR 5106).
PSCI 5700 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.570)
Basic Research Methods
A course in applied research design and methodology, with emphasis on empirical research strategies that are amenable to quantification. Master's students who ha ve not completed Political Science PSCI 2700 (or its equivalent) with high honours or better standing may be required to take this course.
PSCI 5701 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.571)
Intermediate Polimetrics for Micro Data
This course covers intermediate research de signs and statistical techniques primarily used in analyzing survey data. Selected topics may vary from year to year. Students intending to do research based on micro data are advised to take this course. Also offered at the undergraduate level, with different requirements, as Political Science PSCI 4701, for which additional credit is precluded.
Prerequisite: Political Science PSCI 5700 or permission of the Department.
PSCI 5702 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.572)
Intermediate Polimetrics for Macro Data
This course covers intermediate research designs and statistical techniques primarily used in analyzing macro or aggregate data. Selected topics may vary from year to year. Students intending to do research based on macro data are advised to take this course. Also offered at the undergraduate level, with different requirements, as Political Science PSCI 4702, for which additional credit is precluded.
Prerequisite: Political Science PSCI 5700 or permission of the Department.
PSCI 5703 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.573)
Advanced Research Methods
A course in advanced techniques of analysis. The focus of this research seminar is the use of various mathematical and statistical techniques in the construction and analysis of political theory. The seminar may include such topics as the translation of verbal theory into formal theory, the use of statistical techniques beyond regression and correlational analysis to examine political hypotheses, and index construction, including scaling and validation techniques.
Prerequisite: PSCI 5700 or permission of the Department.
PSCI 5801 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.581)
Foreign Policies of African States
The foreign policy determinants and international behaviour of African states. Each year, the seminar focuses on a particular issue area. Precludes additional credit for PSCI 5802.
Prerequisite: permission of the Department.
PSCI 5802 [0.5]
Political Economy of Global Finance
An exploration of the organization of the global financial system. Issues include the relationship between global finance and the state and problems associated with governing global finance. Also offered at the undergraduate level, with different requirements, as PSCI 4805, for which additional credit is precluded.
PSCI 5803 [0.5 credit]
Transatlantic Security Issues
NATO as a political and military alliance. Military capabilities of selected NATO members. NATO and 21st century threats. Security roles for the EU and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe. Also offered at the undergraduate level, with different requirements, as PSCI 4806, for which additional credit is precluded.
PSCI 5804 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.584)
International Relations of South and South-East Asia
Foreign policy orientations of the regional actors and interaction with non-regional actors. Special emphasis on enduring sources of conflict within the area, and emerging patterns of co-operation, including comparison of ASEAN with SAARC. Also offered at the undergraduate level, with different requirements, as PSCI 4804, for which additional credit is precluded.
PSCI 5805 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.585)
Foreign Policy Analysis
A research seminar dealing with selected problems in the study of foreign policy formulations and outcomes.
PSCI 5806 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.586)
Strategic Thought and Issues in International Security
A research seminar on the evolution of classical and contemporary strategic thought, as well as on current issues in international security.
PSCI 5807 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.587)
Analysis of International Organizations
A research seminar on process and change in contemporary forms of international organization.
PSCI 5808 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.588)
International Political Economy
A seminar on the changing international division of labour, and its consequences for world politics. Topics include differing patterns of industrialization, colonial relations, the role of the state, and current issues in international political economy. (Also listed as INAF 5808.)
Prerequisite: Work at a senior undergraduate level in at least two of the following: international relations, development studies, international trade, or political economy; or permission of the Department.
PSCI 5809 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.589)
Problems in International Politics
A workshop on significant issues in the study of international politics, with emphasis on the state of the field (and subfields) and problems in research.
Prerequisite: PSCI 5600, or PSCI 6600 and PSCI 6601, or permission of the Department.
PSCI 5900 [1.0 credit] (formerly 47.590)
Tutorial in a Selected Field
Tutorials or reading courses on selected topics may be arranged with the permission of the Department.
PSCI 5901 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.591)
Tutorial in a Selected Field
Tutorials or reading courses on selected topics may be arranged with the permission of the Department.
PSCI 5902 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.592)
Internship Placement
Internship placements are approved by the Supervisor of Graduate Studies. Academic requirements are met through an essay and oral examination.
Prerequisite: Selection to Internship Program.
PSCI 5908 [1.0 credit] (formerly 47.598)
M.A. Research Essay
Tutorial for students who write a research essay rather than a thesis.
PSCI 5909 [2.0 credits] (formerly 47.599)
M.A. Thesis Please note that courses numbered PSCI 6000 through PSCI 6601 are open to both M.A. and Ph.D. students.
PSCI 6000 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.600)
The Political Process in Canada I
An analytical study of the democratic political process, with particular reference to political parties and elections, pressure groups, and political leadership in Canada.
Precludes additional credit for PSCI 5100.
PSCI 6001 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.601)
The Political Process in Canada II
An analytical study of the democratic political process, with particular reference to political parties and elections, pressure groups, and political leadership in Canada.
Precludes additional credit for PSCI 5100.
PSCI 6105 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.615)
Comparative Politics I
A research seminar dealing with theories, methods, and problems of comparison.
Precludes additional credit for PSCI 5005.
PSCI 6106 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.616)
Comparative Politics II
A research seminar dealing with particular themes.
Precludes additional credit for PSCI 5005.
PSCI 6300 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.630)
Political Theory I
An intensive examination of the major questions in classical, medieval, modern, and contemporary political philosophy. This political theory course is both historically comprehensive in scope and thematically oriented in depth.
Precludes additional credit for PSCI 5300.
PSCI 6301 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.631)
Political Theory II
An intensive examination of the major questions in classical, medieval, modern, and contemporary political philosophy. This political theory course is both historically comprehensive in scope and thematically oriented in depth.
Precludes additional credit for PSCI 5300.
PSCI 6407 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.647)
Public Policy: Content and Creation
This course provides an opportunity to examine and apply major perspectives on the content and creation of public policy.
PSCI 6408 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.648)
Public Affairs Management and Analysis
A seminar on theories and practice in the management of public affairs, including the environment and administration of the public sector, public opinion, and public communications.
PSCI 6600 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.660)
Theory and Research in International Politics I
An examination of the principal problems in contemporary international relations theory and research, emphasizing the state of the field and current directions in it. Precludes additional credit for PSCI 5600.
PSCI 6601 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.661)
Theory and Research in International Politics II
An examination of the principal problems in contemporary international relations theory and research, emphasizing the state of the field and current directions in it. Precludes additional credit for PSCI 5600.
PSCI 6900 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.690)
Ph.D. Field Examination I
Ph.D. preparation for the major field examination I. The grade to be awarded will be that obtained on the field examination.
PSCI 6905 [0.5 credit] (formerly 47.695)
Ph.D. Field Examination II
Ph.D. preparation for the major field examination II. The grade to be awarded will be that obtained on the field examination.
PSCI 6906 [1.0 credit] (formerly 47.696)
Thesis Proposal Workshop
Following a survey of general issues and problems in developing research proposals, students will prepare their own thesis proposal. Coordinated by one instructor, but faculty from other fields will also participate. The grade for this course will be Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of comprehensive examinations or permission of the Department.
PSCI 6909 [5.0 credits] (formerly 47.699)
Ph.D. Thesis
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