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Graduate Calendar Archives: 2004 / 2005

The Ottawa-Carleton Geoscience Centre

2240 Herzberg Building
Telephone: 520-3515
Fax: 520-5613
E-mail: earth_sciences@carleton.ca
Web site: www.earthsci.carleton.ca/ocgc

The Centre

Director of the Centre, R.W. Arnott

Established in 1982, the Ottawa-Carleton Geoscience Centre, a joint initiative of Carleton University and the University of Ottawa, offers programs leading to the degrees of M.Sc. and Ph.D. in most areas of geoscience. The Centre houses modern instrumental facilities, and research activity includes most areas of the Earth Sciences.

The size of the Centre and its location in the nation's capital offer unique opportunities for collaborative research over a broad range of disciplines. Of particular note is the Centre's close collaboration with the Geological Survey of Canada. The campuses are fifteen minutes apart by complimentary inter-university transport and within a short distance of most federal facilities.

Graduate students are enrolled in the university where their faculty supervisors hold appointments. Students draw from a program of courses in English or French and may pursue their research in either language.

Applications for graduate admission are made to the Director of the Centre.

The research interests of members of the Centre are listed below.

Members of the Centre

The home department of each member is indicated by (CU) for the Department of Earth Sciences, Carleton University; (UO) for the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa; (CE) for the Department of Civil Engineering, Carleton University; (PHY) for the Department of Physics, University of Ottawa; (GEOGCU) for the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies at Carleton University; (GEOGUO) for the Department of Geography at the University of Ottawa.

  • F.P. Agterberg, Geomathematics, evaluation of non-renewable resources, automated stratigraphic correlation (UO-Adjunct)
  • R.W. Arnott, Clastic sedimentology, experimental sedimentology (UO)
  • I. Asudeh, Seismology and instrumentation (CU-Adjunct)
  • G.M. Atkinson, Engineering seismology, strong ground motion, seismic hazard (CU)
  • A. Bannari, Remote sensing and geographic information systems (GEOGUO)
  • Keith Bell, Isotope studies, petrology of alkaline rocks and carbonatites, geochronology (CU)
  • Keith Benn, Structural geology, structural petrology, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility, basement tectonics (UO)
  • R.G. Berman, Metamorphic petrology, experimental petrology (CU-Adjunct)
  • John Blenkinsop, Mass spectrometry, geochronology, isotope geochemistry (CU)
  • G.F. Bonham-Carter, Spatial information systems, spatial data modeling (UO-Adjunct)
  • R.L. Brown, Tectonics and structural geology (CU)
  • C.R. Burn, Permafrost and ground ice, Yukon and Western Arctic (GEOGCU)
  • S.D. Carr, Cordilleran and Grenville tectonics, U-Pb geochronology (CU)
  • I.D. Clark, Hydrogeology, environmental isotope geochemistry (UO)
  • B.L. Cousens, Igneous petrology, isotope geochemistry (CU-Adjunct)
  • S.L. Cumbaa,Vertebrate paleontology and paleoecology (CU-Adjunct)
  • W.J. Davis, U-Pb geochronology, isotope geochemistry; precambrian lithospheric evolution (CU-Adjunct)
  • André Desrochers, Carbonate sedimentology and diagenesis, Canadian Arctic (UO)
  • G.R. Dix, Sedimentology and stratigraphy, emphasis on modern and ancient carbonate settings (CU)
  • J.A. Donaldson, Precambrian stratigraphy and sedimentology (CU-Adjunct)
  • R.M. Easton, Grenville and Proterozoic geology, physical volcanology, geochemistry (CU-Adjunct)
  • T.S. Ercit,Origin and internal evolution of granitic pegmatites, application of mineral systematics to problems in the earth sciences and solid-state chemistry, mineralogy, geochemistry and economic geology of tantalum and niobium (CU-Adjunct)
  • David Fisher, Glaciolology, ice cores, past climate change, Martian glaciology and planetary ices (UO-Adjunct)
  • Danielle Fortin, Geomicrobiology; environmental geochemistry (OU)
  • A.D. Fowler, Geochemistry, Archean metavolcanic belts, non-linear dynamics (UO)
  • William K. Fyson, Structural analyses in metamorphic terrains (OU-Adjunct)
  • Konrad Gajewski, Climatology and climatic changes: quaternary paleoecology (GEOGUO)
  • Marie-Anne Geurts, Palynology and geomorphology, traverti ne (GEOGUO)
  • H.J. Gibson, Subaqueous volcanic processes and metallic mineral deposits (CU-Adjunct)
  • W.D. Goodfellow, Geochemistry of modern and ancient sediment-hosted deposits, mass extinction (UO-Adjunct)
  • M.D. Hannington, Economic geology, mineral deposits (CU-Adjunct)
  • K.H. Hattori, Isotope geochemistry, mineral deposits, Archean geology (UO)
  • Donald D. Hogarth, Mineralogy; igneous and metamorphic petrology; alkalic rocks (OU-Adjunct)
  • P.G. Johnson, Glacial geomorphology, slope mass movements, glacier hydrology (GEOGUO)
  • D.J. King, Remote sensing, vegetation damage assessment including geobotanical techniques, Geographic Information Systems (GEOGCU)
  • Thomas Kotzer, Environmental isotope geochemistry; hydrogeology; radioisotopes (OU- Adjunct)
  • Jarmila Kukalova-Peck, Paleontology, fossil insects (CU-Adjunct)
  • A.E. Lalonde, Petrology and mineralogy of Plutonic Rocks (UO)
  • M. Lamontagne, Intraplate seismicity (CU-Adjunct)
  • Bernard Lauriol, Geomorphology (GEOGUO)
  • D.A. Leckie, Clastic sedimentology, sequence stratigraphy, basin analysis (CU-Adjunct)
  • Michael Carl Lesher, Economic geology, igneous geochemistry, volcanology (UO-Adjunct)
  • A.G. Lewkowicz, Permafrost geomorphology, hydrogeology, effect of global change on Arctic terrain (GEOGUO)
  • Yvan L'Heureux, Non-linear dynamics; crystal growth modeling (PHY)
  • Joyce Lundberg, Karst, quaternary studies, geochronology (GEOGCU)
  • Andrew M. McDonald, Mineral of hyperalkaline rocks: crystal chemistry; sulfide mineralogy (UO-Adjunct)
  • F.A. Michel, Isotope geochemistry, groundwater and permafrost studies (CU)
  • D. Murphy, Structural geology and tectonics; geology of the Canadian Cordillera (CU-Adjunct)
  • R.T. Patterson, Micropaleontology specializing in foraminifera (CU)
  • R. Peinitz, Quaternary geology (CU-Adjunct)
  • J.A. Percival, Igneous and metamorphic petrology, geochemistry, structural geology, geochronology (UO-Adjunct)
  • A. Prokoph, Quantitative stratigraphy (UO-Adjunct)
  • R.H. Rainbird, Precambrian sedimentology and stratigraphy (CU-Adjunct)
  • Giorgio Ranalli, Rheology of the Earth, geodynamics, plate tectonics (CU)
  • D.G. Rancourt, Mössbauer spectrometry, mineralogy, geobarometry, geothermometry, micas (PHY)
  • Patricia Rasmussen, Environmental biochemistry (UO-Adjunct)
  • M.R. Robin, Contaminant hydrogeology, geostatistics, geomathematics (UO)
  • H. Roe, Quaternary geology (CU-Adjunct)
  • C. Samson,Applied geophysics (CU)
  • M. Sawada, Paleoclimatology, GIS, Quaternary, Holocene, climate change, spatial analysis, spatial statistics, analog, MAT (GEOGUO) (CU-Adjunct)
  • C.J. Schröder-Adams, Micropaleontology, biostratigraphy, paleoecology, foraminifera, sequence stratigraphy (CU)
  • G.B. Skippen, Metamorphic petrology, aqueous geochemistry (CU)
  • M.W. Smith, Permafrost, microclimate, soil freezing (GEOGCU)
  • R.P. Taylor, Mineral deposits, resource studies (CU)
  • J.K. Torrance, Soil chemistry, clays, oxide minerals and geotechnical problems (GEOGCU)
  • Cees van Staal, Sedimentary and metamorphic terranes in Europe and North America and tectonic evolution of th e Appalachian orogen (UO-Adjunct)
  • Jan Veizer, Sedimentary geochemistry, carbonates, diagenesis, ores, Precambrian sedimentology (UO)
  • D.H. Watkinson, Metallic mineral deposits (CU)
  • P.J. Williams, Soil freezing and geotechnical problems, cold region pipelines (GEOGCU - Distinguished Research Professor)
  • Xiao-Chun Wu, Vertebrate paleontology (CU-Adjunct)

Master of Science

Admission Requirements

The normal requirement for admission to the program is an Honours B.Sc. degree, with at least high honours standing, in geology or a related discipline.

Program Requirements

  • A research thesis defended at an oral examination
  • The equivalent of 2.0 credits, one of which may be at the senior undergraduate level
  • Public lecture on thesis results prior to the thesis examination

Academic Standing

A grade of B- or better must normallybe received in each course counted towards the Master's degree.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission Requirements

The normal requirement for admission to the Ph.D. Program is an M.Sc. degree in Earth Sciences or a related discipline.

Students who show outstanding academic performance and research promise may be permitted to transfer to the Ph.D. program. A student requesting such a transfer must first successfully complete the Ph.D. comprehensive examination and the M.Sc. course requirements.

Program Requirements

  • A research thesis defended orally before an examination board which includes an external examiner
  • A comprehensive examination to include presentation of a thesis proposal and three areas chosen by the student's advisory committee and approved by the Director of the Ottawa-Carleton Geoscience Centre
  • A minimum of 1.0 credit at the graduate level. Additional courses may be prescribed by the thesis advisory committee
  • Public lecture on thesis results prior to the thesis examination

Residence Requirement

The normal residence requirement for the Ph.D. degree is at least four terms of full-time study.

Guidelines for Completion of Master's and Doctoral Degrees

Full-time students enrolled in the 5.0 credit M.Sc. program are expected to complete the program by the end of six terms, and part-time students by the end of six years. A thesis proposal and selection of the thesis committee should be completed by the end of the second term for both Ph.D. and M.Sc. students.

Full-time students enrolled in the 10.0 credit Ph.D. program are expected to complete the program by the end of four years, and part-time students by the end of eight years, with the opportunity for extensions upon the recommendation of the supervisor and departmental supervisor of graduate studies. A comprehensive examination for Ph.D. students must be completed by the end of the first year.

Directed Studies Courses

Directed studies courses are not permitted as credit toward the graduate degree requirements. Such courses may be taken as extra to the minimum requirements for the M.Sc. or Ph.D. degrees.

Graduate Courses

Not all of the following courses are offered in a given year. For an up-to-date statement of course offerings for 2004-2005 and to determine the term of offering, consult the Registration Instructions and Class Schedule booklet, published in the summer and also available online at www.carleton.ca/cu/programs/s ched_dates/

Course Designation System

Carleton's course designation system has been restructured. The first entry of each course description below is the new alphanumeric Carleton course code, followed by its credit value in brackets. The old Carleton course number (in parentheses) is included for reference, where applicable.

University of Ottawa course numbers appear in parentheses after the Carleton course number and credit information.

GEOL 5001 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.501) (GEO 5101)
Seminars in Earth Sciences I
One-term modular courses covering a spectrum of Earth Science topics and current research problems, ranging from the geology and geophysics of the solid Earth, to its surface environment and crustal resources. A minimum of four modules offered per term, three must be completed to obtain course credit. Students may not normally take a module for credit that is offered by their supervisor, but may do so with the permission of the Director. Choice of modules must be approved by the Centre Director. Course complements GEOL 5002.
GEOL 5002 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.502) (GEO 5102)
Seminars in Earth Sciences II
One-term modular courses covering a spectrum of Earth Science topics and current research problems, ranging from the geology and geophysics of the solid Earth, to its surface environment and crustal resources. A minimum of four modules offered per term, three must be completed to obtain course credit. Students may not normally take a module for credit that is offered by their supervisor, but may do so with the permission of the Director. Choice of modules must be approved by the Centre Director. Course complements GEOL 5001.
GEOL 5104 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.514) (GEO 5114)
Mineralogy
An advanced course covering selected topics in mineralogy, such as crystallography, crystal chemistry, crystal structure, mineralogy of rock-forming mineral groups, and instrumental methods in mineralogical research, such as use of electronic optical instruments, spectroscopy, and X-ray crystallography; seminar presentations and practical exercises included.
GEOL 5201 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.521) (GEO 5121)
Igneous Petrogenesis
Concentration on one or more of: origin and differentiation of basaltic magma; origin of granites; computer modeling of partial melting and fractional crystallization; magmatism in time and space, physical processes in igneous petrology. Laboratory and lecture material linked together in project form. (Also listed as GEO 5721.)
GEOL 5201 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.521) (GEO 5721)
Pétrogenèse Ignée
Un cours basé sur un (ou plusieurs) des thèmes suivants: origine et différenciation de magma basaltique; origine de granites; simulation par ordinateur de fusion partielle et cristallisation fractionnée; magmatisme en temps et en espace. Laboratoire et cours qui s'enchainent sous forme d'un projet.
GEOL 5202 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.522) (GEO 5122)
Physical Volcanology
The distribution, classification and physical characteristics of volcanoes and other volcanic landforms; lava flows, tephra, breccias, and other rocks formed through volcanic activity. Volcanic environments; recognition of ancient volcanic features; case histories.
GEOL 5203 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.523) (GEO 5123)
Metamorphic Petrology
Thermodynamics and kinetics of mineral reactions; metamorphic zones and isograds; mass transfer; regional and global aspects of metamorphism.
GEOL 5204 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.524) (GEO 5124)
Mineral Deposits
Relationships of some metallic mineral deposits to igneous rocks; topics range from oxides and sulphides in and around intrusions to stratiform volcanogenic deposits. Course includes a field trip to northern Ontario and Quebec.
GEOL 5300 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.530) ( GEO 5130)
Dynamics of Sedimentary Systems
Weathering, rivers, ocean and atmosphere, sedimentation and tectonism, basins and their sediments, P-T evolution, compaction, diagenesis, brines and fluid dynamics, mineralization, rock cycle and evolution through geologic time.
GEOL 5301 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.531) (GEO 5131)
Siliciclastic Sedimentology
Origin and significance of physical sedimentary processes and structures. Analysis of ancient siliciclastic depositional environments in a facies model and sequence stratigraphic framework. Course involves lectures, seminars and field excursions.
GEOL 5303 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.533) (GEO 5133)
Advanced Micropaleontology
Selected topics in micropaleontology covered in greater detail than in introductory micropaleontology. Areas addressed include the paleoecology, biogeography and biology of foraminifera and other microfossil groups, as well as their application to biostratigraphy and paleo-oceanography.
GEOL 5305 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.535) (GEO 5135)
Carbonate Sedimentology
Lectures and seminars will cover aspects of modern depositional systems, dynamic facies models, sequence stratigraphy, mineralogy, and diagenesis of carbonate sediments. The practical part of the course will consist of a field-laboratory project that integrates various techniques in carbonate sedimentology (mapping, petrography, staining, Cathodoluminescence, fluorescence, SEM)
GEOL 5306 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.536) (GEO 5136)
Paleobiology
Selected topics in paleobiology of marine fossils. Topics include extinctions, micro- and macro-evolutionary processes, long-term trends and cycles in the Phanerozoic, and functional morphology.
GEOL 5308 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.538)
Marine Geology
Development of ocean basins, physical and chemical oceanographic processes, paleocea nographic changes of watermass distribution and circulation patterns, interaction between atmosphere and ocean, marine sedimentation, offshore seismic stratigraphy, marine habitats, marine instrumention.
GEOL 5309 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.539) (GEO 5139)
Glacial Sedimentology
Systematic study of various glacial and glacially related sedimentary environments and processes. Significance of genesis of glacial sediments for stratigraphic correlations, mineral exploration, interpretation of environmental geochemistry, aggregate evaluation, and hydrogeology. Weekly two-hour lectures and field excursions.
GEOL 5400 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.540) (GEO 5140)
Pleistocene Permafrost and Periglacial Environments
An examination of the stratigraphical evidence for cold, non-glacial conditions during the Pleistocene when extensive areas of mid latitude were exposed to intense frost action and permafrost. Pleistocene periglacial sediments and sedimentary structures indicative of past permafrost are considered.
GEOL 5401 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.541) (GEO 5141)
Permafrost Hydrology and Investigative Methods
An examination of groundwater flow in permafrost regions. The importance of groundwater in the formation of various types of ground ice, and the effect of groundwater flow on permafrost distribution.
GEOL 5402 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.542) (GEO 5142)
Environmental Geoscience
A study-seminar course in which students will examine, in depth, certain environmental problems, including geological hazards, mineral and energy consumption and environmental degradation. The relation between development and the environment will be considered. Students will prepare a report and present a seminar on a subject of their choice, and will participate in a research project centred in the Ottawa area.
GEOL 5403 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.543) (GEO 5143)
Environmental Is otopes and Groundwater Geochemistry
Stable environmental isotopes (18O, 2H, 13C, 34S, 15N) in studies of groundwater origin and flow, and geothermal studies. Groundwater dating techniques involving tritium and radio-carbon, and exotic radioisotopes (e.g.,36Cl, 39Ar, 85Kr). Low temperature aqueous geochemistry and mineral solubility with emphasis on the carbonate system. Some application to paleoclimatology will be discussed.
Prerequisite: Fourth-year hydrogeology (GEOL 4200 or GEO 4192) or the equivalent.
GEOL 5404 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.544) (GEO 5144)
Groundwater Resources
Advanced topics in the exploration and development of groundwater resources, including detailed aquifer response analysis. Examination of hydrogeology in arid and undeveloped regions will also be included.
Prerequisite: Fourth-year hydrogeology (GEOL 4200 or GEO 4192) or the equivalent.
GEOL 5406 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.546) (GEO 5146)
Numerical Methods in Hydrogeology
Application of numerical methods in hydrogeological problem solving, including a review of governing equations, initial and boundary conditions, and both finite element and finite difference methods. Additional topics to be explored include particle tracking, Laplace and Fourier transforms, and stochastic methods.
Prerequisite: Fourth-year hydrogeology or permission of instructor.
GEOL 5407 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.547) (GEO 5147)
Geochemistry of Natural Waters
Aqueous speciation, solubility of metals, minerals and gas, reaction kinetics and equilibria. Chemistry and dynamics of groundwaters and hydrothermal fluids.
GEOL 5408 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.548) (GEO 5148)
Theory of Flow and Transport in Porous Media
Course designed for hydrogeologists and engineers who want in-depth understanding of the theory of fluid flow and solute transport through geological materials. Emphasis on porous media. Topics to be covered: types of fluids and porous media; saturated, unsaturated, and multi-phase flow; development of solute transport equations using continuum and stochastic approaches. One three-hour lecture per week, reading and problem-solving assignments plus final examination.
Prerequisites: Fourth-year hydrogeology, second-year calculus, and first-year statistics, or permission of the instructor.
GEOL 5501 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.551) (GEO 5151)
Precambrian Geology
Problems of Precambrian geology, emphasizing classical and current studies in North America; comparative study of the Canadian Shield and other Precambrian shields; research projects, field trips and petrologic studies of representative rock suites.
GEOL 5503 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.553) (GEO 5153)
Computer Techniques in the Earth Sciences
A practical course in the application of computer techniques in the acquisition and interpretation of geoscientific data. Topics will be selected from the following: remote sensing and geographic information systems; geostatistical analysis techniques; analysis and modeling of geoscientific data.
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.
GEOL 5507 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.557) (GEO 5157)
Tectonic Processes Emphasizing Geochronology and Metamorphism
Applications of empirical, analytical and quantitative techniques to problems in regional geology and crustal tectonics; orogenic processes; heat and metamorphism; isotopic geochronology as applied to thermal history; derivation and interpretation of P-T-t paths.
GEOL 5600 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.560) (GEO 5160)
Chemistry of the Earth
An investigation of the geochemical constitution of the Earth and how the Earth has evolved. Topics will include meteorites and the early history of the Earth; chemical and isotopic constraints on the geochemical evolution of the crust and man tle; Earth models and their limitations.
GEOL 5602 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.562) (GEO 5162)
Physical Geochemistry
Application of thermodynamics to geologic problems. Experimental study of mineral equilibria.
GEOL 5603 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.563) (GEO 5163)
Stable Isotope Geochemistry
Mechanisms of isotope fractionation in nature; physical and chemical isotope fractionation, kinetic isotope effects. Variation of stable isotope ratios (hydrogen, carbon, oxygen and sulphur) in nature. Preparation techniques of natural samples for isotope analysis. Applications of stable isotopes to study magma genesis, ore genesis, nature of water and formation fluids and sedimentary environments.
GEOL 5609 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.569) (GEO 5169)
Radioisotope Geochemistry
Nucleosynthesis; chemical differentiation of the Earth. Evolution of large-scale reservoirs. Isotopic tracers (143Nd/144Nd, 87Sr/86Sr, common Pb). Geochronology; fundamentals and application of Sm/Nd, Rb/Sr, U/Pb, K/Ar and Lu/Hf methods. Evolution of the solid Earth from the isotopic perspective.
Precludes additional credit for Geology 67.565 (GEO 5165) (taken before 1997-98).
GEOL 5701 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.571) (GEO 5171)
Physics of the Earth
The physics and dynamics of the solid Earth: seismology; gravitational and magnetic fields, thermal state. Geophysical constraints on the structure and composition of the interior. Geodynamic processes.
GEOL 5702 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.572) (GEO 5172)
Tectonophysics
The physics of deformation; continuum mechanics approach (elasticity, strength, plasticity, viscosity), and micro-rheological approach (diffusion, dislocations, and flow mechanisms). Applications to tectonic processes.
GEOL 5703 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.573) (GEO 5173)
Structural Geology
Selected problems in structural geology treated in seminar and laboratory sessions. Emphasis on interpretation of fabrics developed during synmetamorphic strain. Students investigate and report on individual projects.
GEOL 5704 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.574) (GEO 5174)
Tectonics
An investigation of the structural style of mountain belts and their tectonic setting; tectonics of Precambrian deformed belts.
GEOL 5707 [0.5 credit] (formerly 67.577)
(GEO 5177)
Engineering Seismology
Seismological topics with engineering applications. Characterization of seismicity and seismic sources (areas and faults). Seismic hazard analysis. Empirical and theoretical modeling of strong ground motion in time and frequency domain.
GEOL 5900 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.590) (GEO 5190)
Directed Studies
Directed reading and/or laboratory studies for 1.0 credit course, under the guidance of selected extramural or intramural directors. A written description of the project must be submitted for departmental approval prior to registration. This course does not count for credit toward the graduate degree requirements.
GEOL 5901 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.591) (GEO 5191)
Directed Studies
Directed reading and/or laboratory studies for 0.5 credit course, under the guidance of selected extramural or intramural directors. A written description of the project must be submitted for departmental approval prior to registration. This course does not count for credit toward the graduate degree requirements.
GEOL 5903 [0.5credit] (formerly 67.593) (GEO 5193)
Field Studies
Systematic investigations of geological problems, based on a minimum of fifteen days field work plus related library research and laboratory projects. Written report required.
GEOL 5909 (formerly 67.599)
(GEO 7999)
M.Sc. Thesis
A thesis proposal must be approv ed by the research advisory committee by the end of the first year of registration.
GEOL 6909 (formerly 67.699) (GEO 9999)
Ph.D. Thesis
A thesis proposal must be approved by the research advisory committee by the end of the first year of registration.
The following geography courses are included in the Centre's program:
Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Carleton University
GEOG 5300 (formerly 45.530)
Soil Thermal and Hydrologic Regimes
Characteristics of soil regimes, particularly in freezing soils, role of soil properties; analytical and numerical methods, including computer simulation.
GEOG 5302 (formerly 45.532)
Soil Thermal and Hydrologic Properties
Instrumental techniques for investigation of hydrological and thermal processes near the Earth's surface, laboratory instrumentation and analysis of laboratory and field procedures in geotechnical science.
GEOG 5300 (formerly 45.533)
Periglacial Geomorphology
Permafrost, its distribution and significance, seasonal ground freezing, ground thermal regime, physical, thermodynamic, and geotechnical properties of freezing and thawing soils, terrain features ascribable to frost action, and solifluction and patterned ground.
GEOG 5304 (formerly 45.534)
Aspects of Clay Mineralogy and Soil Chemistry
The role of clay minerals in soils will be considered from a geotechnical and/or biological perspective.
GEOG 5803 (formerly 45.583)
Remote Sensing and Image Analysis
Radiometric, geometric and resolution characteristics of remotely sensed data, image processing algorithms, analysis of spectral, textural, and contextual image information, applications in vegetation mapping and environmental analysis.
Department of Geography, University of Ottawa
GEG 5101
Field and Laboratory Research Methods A
GEG 5301
Cold Regions Hydrology and Geomorphology
Selected topics in the hydrology and geomorphology of cold regions. Emphasis on glacierized, periglacial, or nival environments. This course will alternate with GEG 5701.
GEG 5307
Research Design, Modeling and Environmental Data Analysis
Evaluation of the methodology of physical geography. Research and the role of modeling and advanced data analysis in contemporary research. This course will alternate with GEG 5707.
GEG 5701
Hydrologie et Géomorphologie des Régions Froides
Thèmes en hydrologie et en géomorphologie des régions froides. Exploration approfondie des environnements glaciaires, périglaciaires ou nivaux. Cours offert en alternance avec GEG 5301.
GEG 5707
Conception d'un Projet de Recherche, Modélisation et Analyse de Données Environnementales
Évaluation des méthodes de recherche en géographie physique. Rôle de la modélisation et de l'analyse avancée des données dans la recherche contemporaine. Cours offert en alternance avec le GEG 5307.
GEG 7103
Palaeoenvironmental Reconstruction and Climate Change
Theories of environmental change in relation to natural and anthropogenically induced climate change. Techniques used in palaeoenvironmental reconstruction. This course will alternate with GEG 7503.
GEG 7107
Northern Ecosystems
Dynamics of northern ecosystems with particular emphasis on their sensitivity to climate variability and climate change. This course will alternate with GEG 7507.
GEG 7301
Field and Laboratory Research Method C
GEG 7503
Reconstruction Paléoenvironnementale et Changement Climatique
Théories des changements environnementaux mises en relation avec les changements climatique d'origine naturelle ou d'origine anthropique. Méthodes utilisées dans la reconstruction paléoenvironnementale. Cours offert en alternance avec GEG 7103.
GEG 7507
Ecosystèmes Nordiques
Dynamique des écosystèmes nordiques en mettant l'accent sur leur sensibilité à la variabilité et au changement climatiques. Cours offert en alternance avec GEG 7107.
GEG 7703
Méthodes de Recherche sur le Terrain et au Laboratoire D.
GEG 7107
Northern Ecosystems
Dynamics of northern ecosystems with particular emphasis on their sensitivity to climate variability and climate change. This course will alternate with GEG 7507.
GEG 7301
Field and Laboratory Research Method C
GEG 7503
Reconstruction Paléoenvironnementale et Changement Climatique
Théories des changements environnementaux mises en relation avec les changements climatique d'origine naturelle ou d'origine anthropique. Méthodes utilisées dans la reconstruction paléoenvironnementale. Cours offert en alternance avec GEG 7103.
GEG 7507
Ecosystèmes Nordiques
Dynamique des écosystèmes nordiques en mettant l'accent sur leur sensibilité à la variabilité et au changement climatiques. Cours offert en alternance avec GEG 7107.
GEG 7703
Méthodes de Recherche sur le Terrain et au Laboratoire D
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