The Carleton Institute of Neuroscience


Life Sciences Research Building 325
Telephone: 520-4020
Fax: 520-4052
E-mail: jkelly@ccs.carleton.ca

The Institute


Director: J.B. Kelly

Neuroscience is an emerging academic discipline that includes physiological, anatomical, biochemical, and behavioural studies of the nervous system. At Carleton University, neuroscience research and graduate training are coordinated by the Institute of Neuroscience. Both M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees, with a Specialization in Neuroscience, are offered through either the Departments of Biology or Psychology with supervision by one of the faculty members of the Institute. Application for admission, scholarships, and teaching assistantships should be made through either the Departments of Biology or Psychology depending on background and interests of the student. Further information about the degree programs may be obtained from the director of the Institute of Neuroscience or the supervisor of graduate studies in either Biology or Psychology.

Members of the Institute

Hymie Anisman, Stress, Brain-Immune Interactions, Depression
John Durkin,* Neurochemistry, Cell Signalling, Cerebral Ischemia
Phillip Hicks,* Neural Plasticity, Somatosensory and visual Cortex
Bin Hu,* Thalamic Neurophysiology, Synaptic Signalling
J.B. Kelly, Central Auditory System, Electrophysiology and Behaviour
D.C. McIntyre, Epilepsy, Kindling, Learning and Memory
B.A. Pappas, Brain Development and Aging, Alzheimer's Disease
Leo Renaud,* Hypothalamic Function, Autonomic Regulation, Neuropharmacology
D.C.S. Roberts, Mechanisms of Drug Abuse and Reinforcement
Shu Hui Wu, Auditory Brainstem, Brain Slice Neurophysiology
Robert. M. Zacharko, Intracranial Self-stimulation, Stress, Depression, Dopamine, Anhedonia

The Specialization in Neuroscience


Coordinator of the Specialization:
J.B. Kelly

The University of Ottawa and Carleton University jointly offer a multi-disciplinary Specialization in Neuroscience. The Specialization is intended to augment the research and training which the student receives through his or her primary department. The degree will in each case specify the discipline of the participating unit with Specialization in Neuroscience. The participating departments are:

Four clinical departments from the University of Ottawa Medical School are also affiliated.

Application should be made to the primary department which is most appropriate to the studentís research interest. Once accepted by the department, students must be sponsored by a member of the neuroscience faculty.

Application forms and further information can be obtained by writing directly to any of the primary departments.


Masterís Program


Admission Requirements

The requirements for admission to the masterís neuroscience specialization are as follows: Students with less than a high honours average in their undergraduate and graduate courses will not normally be recommended for admission.

Program Requirements

The Specialization requires that, in addition to fulfilling the requirements for the masterís program of the department in which they are enrolled, the student must successfully complete Psychology 49.520: Basics of Neuroscience. The thesis research must concern a neuroscience topic and must be supervised by a member of the neuroscience faculty.

Doctor of Philosophy


Admission Requirements

Admission requirements to the Ph.D. neuroscience specialization are as follows:

Selection of masterís and doctoral students is carried out by the neuroscience specialization coordinating committee which will select and rank the admissible candidates. Admission is determined by priority of ranking, and the number of admissions depends upon the available positions in the specialization.

Program Requirements

Students must fulfil the Ph.D. program requirements of the department in which they are enrolled. The requirements for the specialization also include the following, some of which may satisfy the Ph.D. requirements of the participating departments:


Graduate Courses**


Neuroscience courses are available through the primary departments. Course offerings vary slightly from year to year and a complete listing can be obtained from the specialization coordinator.

The following are the core courses of the curriculum.

  • Psychology 49.520T2 (PSY6201)
    Basics of Neuroscience
    A comprehensive neuroscience course from membrane and cellular levels to neural systems and behaviour. Lectures and tutorials will cover such aspects of neuroscience as neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, behavioural neuroscience and neuropharmacology.
    (Also offered as Biology 61.534)

  • Biology 61.623F1
    Neuroscience Techniques I
    Completion of a research project carried out under the supervision of a neuroscience faculty member.  Students may carry out their project in any department participating in the neuroscience specialization provided they have approval from the administrative head of their particular program. For example, students in the neuroscience specialization must obtain approval from the neuroscience committee.  Students in the biopsychology concentration must obtain approval from the Department of Psychology. The purpose of the course is to grant credit for learning new research techniques.
    (Also offered as Psychology 49.624)

  • Biology 61.624W1
    Neuroscience Techniques II
    Completion of a research project carried out under the supervision of a neuroscience faculty member.  Students may carry out their project in any department participating in the neuroscience specialization provided they have approval from the administrative head of their particular program. For example, students in the neuroscience specialization must obtain approval from the neuroscience committee.  Students in the biopsychology concentration must obtain approval from the Department of Psychology. The purpose of the course is to grant credit for learning new research techniques.
    (Also offered as Psychology 49.625)

  • Psychology 49.620T2
    Advanced Seminar in Neuroscience
    A comprehensive proseminar covering specialized topics in neuroscience and biopsychology. The presentations will focus on the active research areas and interests of faculty members and will provide an in-depth coverage of research strategies, methods and results. Graduate student presentations of current research projects will be an integral part of the course.
    Prerequisite: Psychology 49.520 (Also offered as Biology 61.633)