Faculty, Fellows and Staff of CSDS

Director

David Mendeloff, PhD (MIT)

Associate Professor, NPSIA

David Mendeloff has served as Director of the Centre for Security and Defence Studies since January 2005. Dr. Mendeloff's research interests include causes and prevention of war; nationalist, ethnic and identity conflict;post-conflict peacebuilding and transitional justice; and national misperceptions and ideational sources of foreign policy. He teaches courses in conflict analysis, peacebuilding and reconstruction, and post-conflict justice.

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Deputy Director

Chris Penny, LL.M. (Cornell)

Assistant Professor, NPSIA

Chris Penny is a specialist in international law. His research relates to regulating the use of force, including jus ad bellum and jus in bello issues.

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Faculty Associates

David Carment, PhD (McGill)

Professor, NPSIA

David Carment focuses on international conflict analysis, conflict mediation, international organization, conflict resolution and international relations theory. His research interests include the international dimensions of ethnic conflict, the role of communication technologies in conflict analysis and resolution, early warning, peacekeeping, conflict prevention, peacebuilding and security issues in South and Southeast Asia, Eastern Europe and Africa.

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Andrew Cohen, M.A. (NPSIA)

Associate Professor, School of Journalism and Communication, and NPSIA

Andrew Cohen is former foreign editor and foreign affairs columnist for the Financial Post. He has also served as the national political correspondent for Saturday Night magazine and as a member of the editorial board of the Globe and Mail. He was the Globe's Washington correspondent from 1997 until joining the School of Journalism and Communication and NPSIA in 2001. He recently served as the first President of the Historica-Dominion Institute. A former visiting fellow at the Centre of International Studies at the University of Cambridge, he is author of A Deal Undone: The Making and Breaking of the Meech Lake Accord, While Canada Slept: How We Lost Our Place in the World, which was a finalist for the Governor General's literary award for non-fiction, and most recently, the biography, Lester B. Pearson. Prof. Cohen also writes a regular syndicated column in the Ottawa Citizen.

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Jean Daudelin, PhD (Laval)

Assistant Professor, NPSIA

Jean Daudelin is a specialist of Latin America. He has published on religious movements, human security, humanitarian intervention, Canadian foreign policy and Latin American affairs. He is currently doing research on Canadian and Brazilian foreign and trade policy, human security, land conflict and food security. Before joining NPSIA, he was a Principal Researcher on Development and Conflict at the North South Institute in Ottawa.

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Fen O. Hampson, PhD (Harvard)

Professor and Director, NPSIA

Fen O. Hampson is Chancellor's Professor and Director of the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs.

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G. Norman Hillmer, PhD (Cambridge)

Professor, History

Norman Hillmer is Professor of History and International Affairs at Carleton University, and Editor-at-Large of the Canadian Institute of International Affairs International Journal. Educated at the Universities of Toronto and Cambridge, he was Senior Historian at the Department of National Defence before coming to Carleton in 1990. His twenty books, exploring themes in Canadian politics, diplomacy and security issues, include standard accounts of the history of Canadian-American relations and Canadian foreign policy, both written with J.L. Granatstein. Dr. Hillmer has won several teaching and publishing prizes, including the Canada-Japan Prime Ministers Award (1997), and his work has been translated into Chinese, Japanese, French and Swedish.

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Jez Littlewood, PhD (Bradford)

Assistant Professor, NPSIA
Director, Canadian Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies

Jez Littlewood joined NPSIA in July 2007 as an Assistant Professor and as the Director of the Canadian Centre of Intelligence and Security Studies (CCISS). He teaches the courses on Intelligence, Statecraft and International Affairs (INAF 5204) and Special Topics: Terrorism and International Security (INAF 5409) and conducts research in international security, proliferation and counter-proliferation of WMD, terrorism, homeland security, and intelligence and statecraft. He has served previously as an Advisor to the Counter-Proliferation Department of the UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office, the United Nations Department for Disarmament Affairs (Geneva), and served with HM Forces (Army) of the UK. He is a UK national and permanent resident in Canada.

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David Long, PhD (University of London)

Professor, NPSIA

David Long has written on European foreign and security policy as well as transatlantic relations. His other research interests include the history of international relations theory, ethics in international affairs, and gender in international relations.

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James Milner, D.Phil (Oxford)

James Milner's research interests relate to refugee movements in Africa and Asia, international refugee policy, humanitarian action, and peacebuilding policy and practice. He is a graduate of the University of Toronto and St. Antony's College, Oxford. He has worked as a Consultant for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in India, Cameroon, Guinea and its Geneva Headquarters. He is author of Refugees, the State and the Politics of Asylum in Africa (Palgrave Macmillan, forthcoming), co-author of UNHCR: The Politics and Practice of Refugee Protection into the 21st Century (Routledge, 2008), and co-editor of Protracted Refugee Situations: Political, Human Rights and Security Implications (UN University Press, 2008).

Augustine Park, PhD (York University)

Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology

Augustine Park's reseach examines peacebuilding institutions in post-conflict Sierra Leone. Specifically, she examines the intersection of various institutions (i.e., rule of law institutions, transitional justice, economic justice, and institutions for democracy building) and how peacebuilding efforts must become culturally adaptive to local contexts. Augustine also researches the possibilities for restorative justice following massive atrocities, with particular attention to restorative justice for child and youth soldiers.

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Valerie Percival, PhD (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine)

Assistant Professor, NPSIA

Valerie Percival's research focuses on the relationship between conflict and health. She is a graduate of the University of Toronto, Carleton's Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She has worked with the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, the International Crisis Group, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, and the Peace Research Institute Oslo.

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Dane Rowlands, PhD (Toronto)

Associate Professor and Associate Director, NPSIA

Dane Rowlands is an economist with research interests in conflict and economic development issues, formal modeling of peacekeeping and intervention, and economic policies associated with state failure. Prof. Rowlands also teaches the Economics of Conflict course at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs.

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Brian Schmidt, PhD (SUNY Albany)

Associate Professor, Department of Political Science

Brian Schmidt's research and teaching interests are in international relations theory, American foreign policy, and disciplinary history. His first book The Political Discourse of Anarchy (SUNY 1998), which received the Choice 1998 Outstanding Academic Book Award, examines the history of the field of International Relations from the mid-1800s to the outbreak of World War Two. His new co-edited book with David Long, Imperialism and Internationalism in the Discipline of International Relations (SUNY 2005)examines the early pre-World War One history of the field and focuses on the twin discourses of imperialism and internationalism. At Carleton University, Dr. Schmidt teaches courses on international relations theory, the causes of war, and American foreign policy.

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Elinor Sloan, PhD (Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy)

Associate Professor, Political Science

Elinor Sloan is Associate Professor of International Relations in the Department of Political Science at Carleton University and is a former defence analyst with Canada's Department of National Defence. Dr. Sloan’s research interests include US and Canadian defence policy and military capabilities, the Revolution in Military Affairs and military transformation, homeland defence, ballistic missile defence, NORAD and NATO military capabilities. She is the author of four books, most recently Security and Defence in the Terrorist Era (McGill-Queen's, 2005), and Military Transformation and Modern Warfare (Praeger, 2008).

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Mira Sucharov, PhD (Georgetown)

Associate Professor, Political Science

Mira Sucharov specializes in International Relations theory, international security, conflict resolution, psychological and constructivist approaches to IR, Israeli foreign policy and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and peace process. Her book, The International Self: Psychoanalysis and the Search for Israeli-Palestinian Peace (SUNY Press), investigates the socio-psychoanalytic determinants of Israel's decision to pursue the 1993 Oslo peace process. She teaches courses on International Relations and IR theory, the causes of war, and foreign policy analysis.

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Research Associates

Marie-Eve Desrosiers, PhD (Toronto)

Assistant Professor, University of Ottawa

Marie-Eve Desrosiers is assistant professor in the School of International Development and Global Studies. Her research focuses on the security of developing countries. She studies political crises and civil conflicts, the role of identity in contentious politics, state-society relations, as well as state fragility. Her most recent studies have examined episodes of political violence in Rwanda during the twentieth century. She also conducts research on Canadian foreign and international development policy. She was a founder of the francophone branch of the Canadian Consortium on Human Security and she regularly takes part in civil society activities pertaining to human security.

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Brian Greene, PhD (McGill)

Brian Greene is a strategic analyst at the Centre for Operational Research and Analysis, Defence Research and Development Canada. He is currently working on a book manuscript, Rational Humanitarians: State Identity and Foreign Policy, based on his doctoral dissertation (McGill 2004). He is a specialist in international relations theory, Canadian and American foreign policy and the politics and diplomacy of humanitarian interventions.

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Kurt F. Jensen, Ph.D (Carleton)

Kurt Jensen is a Research Associate with responsibility for the CSDS-CCISS Strategic Analysis Seminar Series directed at individuals with professional involvement in international security affairs. As an Adjunct Professor, he also teaches courses on security and intelligence topics in the Political Science Department at Carleton. He spent more than 30 years in the Canadian diplomatic service where he was extensively involved in foreign intelligence matters. He is the author of Cautious Beginnings: Canadian Foreign Intelligence, 1939-1951. He has also written articles on foreign intelligence and his current research focus is on the Canadian intelligence community.

Joshua Kilberg, PhD (Carleton)

Joshua Kilberg researches the organizational structures and leadership of terrorist groups. He holds a PhD in International Affairs from Carleton University, an MA in War Studies from King's College London (UK) and a BA and BSc from Queen's University.

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Philippe Lagassé, PhD (Carleton)

Assistant Professor, University of Ottawa

Philippe Lagassé is an assistant professor at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Ottawa. His research focuses on Canadian foreign and defence policy, American foreign and defence policy, and theories of war. He holds a B.A. in philosophy from McGill University, an M.A. in war studies from the Royal Military College of Canada, and a Ph.D in political science from Carleton University. His publications have appeared in Canadian Foreign Policy, Defence and Peace Economics, International Journal, and the Canada Among Nations series. He also regularly works as a defence analyst for Canadian media outlets, government departments, and the private sector. Of note, in 2008 Lagassé was asked to serve on the Canadian Navy’s Strategic Advisory Group. His current research focuses on Canadian civil-military relations.

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Sarah Jane Meharg, PhD (Queen's)

Senior Researcher, Pearson Peacekeeping Centre
Adjunct Faculty, Department of Political and Economic Science, Royal Military College

Dr. Sarah Jane Meharg is Senior Research Associate at the Pearson Peacekeeping Centre (Ottawa, Canada), where she is involved in research-led training, education and capacity building activities. Dr. Meharg is a leading post-conflict reconstruction theorist with a regional focus in the Balkans. Dr. Meharg has pioneered an interdisciplinary approach to reconstruction operations through the connections of cultural geography, urban planning, and contemporary armed warfare. She has extensive field research experience in Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Her recent publications include Measuring the Effectiveness of Reconstruction and Stabilization Activities (Pearson Papers, 2007); Identicide and the Geographies of Post-Conflict Reconstruction (Land Quality Press: University of Nottingham, 2007); and the CSDS working paper: Identicide: Precursor to Genocide (CSDS Carleton University, 2006). Dr. Meharg’s books include Helping Hands and Loaded Arms: Navigating the Military and Humanitarian Space (2007, Canadian Peacekeeping Press) and Measuring What Matters in Peace Operations and Crisis Management (forthcoming, April 2009, McGill-Queen’s Press). She also works for the public and private sectors as a research consultant with her company Peace & Conflict Planners Canada.

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Srdjan Vucetic, PhD (Ohio State)

Assistant Professor, University of Ottawa

Srdjan Vucetic (PhD, Ohio State University) is an assistant professor in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Ottawa. His research interests are in American and Canadian foreign policy, international security and political methodology.

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Senior Research Fellows

LGen (Ret) Ken Pennie, PhD (London School of Economics)

Ken Pennie has extensive background in international strategic issues. His three degrees are in International Relations, and he has nearly 40 years of service in the Canadian Forces. He joined the Air Force as a pilot, served with all three services, and thus has developed an in depth understanding of international aerospace and defence operations. He has extensive experience with NATO and NORAD, and had the privilege of commanding at every level, rising to become Chief of the Air Staff, head of Canada’s Air Force. He was Deputy Commander in Chief of NORAD in Colorado Springs (during 9-11 and standup of NORTHCOM) and DND’s Director General Strategic Planning in Ottawa. He has taught Political Science and Business, and is an adjunct professor currently teaching international business strategy at the Sprott School of Business at Carleton University. He has been a consultant for the past three years and is also President of KR Pennie Consulting Inc.

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Martin Rudner, PhD (Jerusalem)

Martin Rudner is a Professor Emeritus and Distinguished Research Professor at Carleton University. Prior to his retirement in July, 2007, he served as a Professor at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs and was founding Director of the Canadian Centre of Intelligence and Security Studies at Carleton. Professor Rudner is author of over ninety books and scholarly articles dealing with Southeast Asia, international affairs, and security and intelligence studies. He has organized and contributed to numerous academic and governmental conferences, seminars and programs, and has served as commentator and analyst on international security affairs for Canadian and international electronic and print media. He has consulted and lectured on security and counter-terrorism issues to various departments and agencies of the Government of Canada and other international authorities. Professor Rudner served on the Advisory Panel for the Policy Review component of the Arar Commission of Inquiry under Mr Justice Dennis O’Connor. He is a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of the International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence.

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Elliot Tepper, PhD (Duke)

Elliot Tepper is Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs. He was an early Associate Director of the School, and is a veteran professor of International Relations and Asian Studies at Carleton University. His international relations research and policy interests span regional security organizations, track two diplomacy, ethnic conflict, role of Diasporas, immigration and demographic change, and human rights. He is the former President of the Canadian Asian Studies Association, serves on the Board of Directors of the International Centre for Human Rights and Democratic Development, the Canada Pakistan Business Council and others. He provides policy advice to Canadian and international agencies and is a frequent media commentator. Dr. Tepper also frequently organizes policy conferences and seminars, including a recent professional development series on "Global Peace and Security" for the Senior Joint Staff of the Department of National Defence.

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Doctoral Student Fellows

John S. Cadham

John Cadham is a doctoral student at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs. His research interests concern the nexus of energy policies and environment policies and the global implications of their increasing securitization. After a successful career as a business operator, consultant and multilateral project facilitator, John Cadham completed his MA in NPSIA’s new Intelligence and National Security stream.

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Maya Dafinova

Maya Dafinova is a doctoral student at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs. Her research interests include: causes and prevention of war, intrastate conflict, the use of force for human protection purposes, and peacebuilding and reconstruction. Her MA thesis (University of Chile in Santiago) examined state reactions to the Responsibility to Protect.

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Roy Fuller

Roy Fuller is PhD Candidate in International Affairs at NPSIA.

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Michael Middleton

Michael Middleton is PhD Candidate in Political Science at Carleton University. His dissertation will examine the changing nature of Border Security in response to transnational sub-state conflict and the mounting tension between border permeability, security and sovereignty. Other research interests include: terrorist organizational development; South Asian security and Canadian Foreign Policy. Prior to his work at Carleton, Michael held positions at the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) and the University of Waterloo.

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Peter Loveridge

Peter Loveridge is a doctoral student at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs. His research interests centre on proactive and collaborative problem-solving and decision-making in the context of global governance – global economic governance in particular – including global governance efforts' potential to proactively prevent and manage conflict.

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Simon Palamar

Simon Palamar is a doctoral student at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs. His research interests fall into the general field of weapons of mass destruction and global non-proliferation regimes, including multilateral nuclear fuel cycle mechanisms/regimes, the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, and WMD proliferation in the Middle East.

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Dave Perry

Dave Perry is a doctoral student in political science at Carleton University. His dissertation research analyzes the privatization of defence and security in the United States, Canada and Great Britain, focusing on the use of Private Military Firms on international operations. He was previously the Deputy Director of Dalhousie University's Centre for Foreign Policy Studies, and holds a BA in Political Science and History from Mount Allison University, and an MA in Political Science from Dalhousie University.

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Gaëlle Rivard Piché

Gaëlle Rivard Piché is a doctoral student at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs. Her current research interests focus on theory of police, security sectors reform and public order in the Caribbean and Central America. Her thesis project looks at policing pluralism in post-conflict countries and developing democracies. During her Master's degree in political science at Université de Montréal, she gained professional experience with the provincial police of Quebec (Sûreté du Québec). Furthermore, while completing her B.A. and M.A. in Montreal, she worked as the coordinator of the Centre for International Peace and Security Studies (Université de Montréal/McGill University).

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2014-15 Model NATO Fellow

Laura Mitchell

Laura Mitchell is MA candidate in International Affairs, and Project Manager of the 2015 Carleton University Model NATO Conference.